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ADU Contractor Santa Clarita, California

These commonly referred to as ADUs, are additional living quarters on a property that is separate from the primary residence. For an ADU Contractor in Santa Clarita, these can be created through the conversion of existing space such as a basement or garage, or they can be built new as an addition to the property as well. 

In the city of Santa Clarita, California, ADU must be approved through the planning process and must comply with all applicable zoning requirements. ADUs provide an opportunity for homeowners to create additional income streams, house extended family members, or provide housing for guests or tenants.

For more information on ADU in Santa Clarita, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU in Santa Clarita!

Best ADU Santa Clarita Contractor.

discover your dream Santa Clarita ADU?

Accessory dwelling units, also known as ADUs, are a great way to add additional living space to your home.

They can be used as a rental unit, in-law suite, or even just a private space for guests.

ADU Contractor

Accessory dwelling unit, commonly known as ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Santa Clarita as a way to create additional living space.

Whether you’re looking for a place for an aging parent, an adult child, or a tenant, an ADU can provide the perfect solution.

In addition, ADUs can be a great way to generate rental income. With the current housing market in Santa Clarita, there has never been a better time to build an ADU.

WE’RE A LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR WHO PAYS ATTENTION TO YOUR NEEDS AND WANTS.

The ADU Santa Clarita team is here to help you every step of the way, from obtaining the necessary permits to finding the right contractor.

If you’re in Santa Clarita, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU!

ADU Santa Clarita Services

If you’re thinking about adding an ADU to your property, there are a few things you need to know first.

The first step is to check with your local planning department to see if there are any restrictions on building an ADU in your neighborhood. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to start thinking about what type of unit you want to build.

There are many different types of ADUs, from small studio units to larger two-bedroom units. You’ll also need to decide if you want to build the unit from scratch or convert an existing space, such as a garage or guest house.

01.

3D DESIGN

We begin by creating your dream Accessory dwelling units with our state-of-the-art 3D design service.

02.

Demolition

We will take care of demolition and cleaning and turn your new Accessory dwelling units it into something special.

03.

Permit Acquisition

We make sure you get all the permits if necessary.

04.

Interior Design

Our Santa Clarita ADU services will help you make your space more efficient.

05.

Electrical & Lighting

Lighting fixtures that will give your home’s interior its perfect atmosphere? We’ve got it covered!

06.

ADUS Cabinets

Whether you’re looking for a sleek, contemporary style or traditional elegance – we have the cabinets to suit your needs.

07.

Plumbing

Bathroom renovations will need some pluming work, to help you out, we offer a range of plumbing services as well!

08.

ADU Countertops

Accessory dwelling unit countertops? We offer a wide variety of stone, quartz, and marble options that will add beauty while also being functional in their use.

09.

Flooring

Finding the right flooring material for you and installing it correctly is important, but we take care of that too!

10.

Windows & Doors

We know you want the best, so our experts will help you with  Windows & Doors installation​​ for all your needs!

Do you need an ADU Santa Clarita Inspiration? check this out!

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Let's Assess Your Santa Clarita ADU Needs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that can be used for a variety of purposes. In Santa Clarita, ADUs are typically used as rental units, guesthouses, or in-law suites.

However, they can also be used as primary residences, office spaces, or even recreational spaces. Regardless of how they are used, ADUs can provide a number of benefits to homeowners.

ADU Contractors in Los Angeles

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Santa Clarita. These secondary units can provide additional living space for family members, and guests, or even generate income through rentals. However, the process of designing and building an ADU can be complex. Fortunately, there are a few key things to keep in mind that can help make the process go more smoothly.

First, it’s important to research the requirements and restrictions for ADUs in your city or county. Every jurisdiction has different rules and regulations governing its construction, so it’s important to be aware of these before you start designing your unit. Second, it’s also a good idea to hire an experienced architect or designer who specializes in ADUs.

They will be familiar with the local regulations and can help ensure that your unit is designed to meet all the requirements. Finally, once you have your plans finalized, it’s important to find a reputable contractor who has experience building ADUs. They will be able to guide you through the construction process and make sure that your unit is built to code.

If you’re thinking about adding an accessory dwelling unit to your property, please give us a call and we can help you with the process.

Top notch home remodeling services

Our vision, our passion

Kitchen remodel beautiful kitchen furniture the drawer in cabinet.

Hiring a professional Kitchen Remodeling contractor in Santa Clarita and San Fernando Valley area is the best way to ensure that your remodeling plans are well thought out and executed.

We will provide you with everything from kitchen cabinets, to multiple countertop options while paying attention to small details such as lighting fixtures!

Trendy features of a modern bathroom

kitchenfer will help you transform your bathroom with a new design that is sure to make it stand out, We specialize in remodeling, modernizing, and designing bathrooms for all types of homes.

With our talented team of professionals, we can provide all the necessary services for your bathroom remodeling project in order to achieve exactly what’s desired!

Room addition

A room addition is a new structure built onto an existing home to create extra space. Room additions are extremely popular due to the fact they add valuable living space as well as home equity.

Our team at KitchenFer is highly experienced at designing and building room additions in Santa Clarita, San Fernando Valley, and Ventura County.

Best Garage Remodeling Los Angeles

Have you been considering a garage conversion? If so, KitchenFer is the company for your! With our process-driven design and construction services, we will take care of everything.

As a homeowner, exploring a garage conversion can be such an exciting time and when you work with our team will make the conversion process as easy for you as possible.

Large house backyard

During a time when people are looking for more space in their homes, an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) is often the best solution. ADUs are perfect to add value and more living space to your property.

We’ll handle everything from design to construction so you don’t have any worries at all, we are a professional team that can manage your entire project.

House remodel

The concept of home remodeling is the process of renovating or making additions to a property. The interior, exterior, and other improvements can include projects such as Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions, garage conversion, accessory dwelling unit and more.

 Call us today! We’ll be happy to help you with all home remodeling projects!

Santa Clarita ADU FAQs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that is attached or detached from a primary residence.

In the city of Santa Clarita, ADUs are commonly referred to as “granny flats” or “in-law units.” They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing additional living space for family members or serving as a rental unit.

ADUs are subject to the same zoning and building regulations as the primary residence on the property. In addition, there are several specific requirements that must be met in order for an ADU to be approved by the city. For instance, the unit must be no larger than 1200 square feet and it must be located on a lot that is at least 6000 square feet in size.

An Accessory Dwelling Unit is a secondary living space that is attached or detached from a primary residence. They are also sometimes called granny flats, in-law units, or secondary units.

To be consistent with the California Building Code and the Health and Safety Code, an Accessory Dwelling Unit must meet the following requirements:

  • The unit must be located on a legal parcel of land that contains a single-family dwelling;
  • The unit must be subordinate to and have an exterior appearance consistent with the primary dwelling on the same parcel;
  • The unit must have no more than two bedrooms and one bathroom;
  • The floor area of the unit (excluding any garage) must be 600 square feet or less.
  • The unit must be served by utilities from the main dwelling or from separate utility connections. An Accessory Dwelling Unit may also be subject to other local zoning regulations.

 

For more information on Accessory Dwelling Units in the City of Los Angeles, please contact the Department of City Planning.

They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing extra living space for guests or family members, generating rental income, or creating a separate workspace.

In addition to the financial benefits, ADUs can also help to increase the overall value of your property. ADUs are subject to the same zoning regulations as the primary dwelling unit, so they must meet all local building and safety codes.

As a result, they can provide a much-needed boost to the housing supply in Los Angeles without negatively impacting the quality of life for residents.

If you’re considering adding an ADU to your property, be sure to contact us to learn more about the process and potential benefits.

Yes, ADUs are legal in the city of Santa Clarita. In fact, the city has actually been working to make it easier for homeowners to build them by reducing zoning and permitting requirements. For more information on the current regulations surrounding ADUs in Santa Clarita, you can visit the website of the Department of City Planning.

Service Areas

Santa Clarita (; Spanish for “Little St. Clare”) is a city in northwestern Los Angeles County in the U.S. state of California. With a 2020 census population of 228,673, it is the third-largest city by population in Los Angeles County, the 17th-largest in California, and the 99th-largest city in the United States. It is located approximately 30 miles (48 km) northwest of downtown Los Angeles, and occupies 70.75 square miles (183.2 km) of land in the Santa Clarita Valley, along the Santa Clara River. It is a unchanging example of a U.S. edge city, satellite city, or boomburb.

Human harmony of the Santa Clarita Valley dates back up to the start of the Chumash people, who were displaced by the Tataviam circa 450 AD. After Spanish colonists arrived in Alta California, the Rancho San Francisco was established, covering much of the Santa Clarita Valley. Henry Mayo Newhall purchased the Rancho San Francisco in 1875 and time-honored the towns of Saugus and Newhall. The Newhall Land and Farming Company played a major role in the city’s development. In December 1987, the city of Santa Clarita was incorporated, encompassing the communities of Canyon Country, Newhall, Saugus, and Valencia. The four communities hold separate identities, and residents commonly direct to one of them bearing in mind asked where they are from. Santa Clarita is bounded on the west by the Golden State Freeway (I-5). The Antelope Valley Freeway (CA-14) runs northeast–southwest forming share of the city’s atypical east boundary. The two freeways meet at Newhall Pass, near the city’s southernmost point.

Santa Clarita is house to three institutions of vanguard education: California Institute of the Arts, an internationally Famous art university; The Master’s University, a Christian avant-garde arts university; and College of the Canyons, a community college. Companies headquartered in or near the city total Princess Cruises, Sunkist, Remo, and the Newhall Land and Farming Company. The unincorporated communities of Castaic and Stevenson Ranch, located to the north and west of the Santa Clarita city limits, respectively, are contiguously associated past the city. Six Flags Magic Mountain, though commonly thought to doing the Valencia ration of Santa Clarita, is also west of Interstate 5 and outside of the Santa Clarita city limits.

Name

The Santa Clara River was named by Spanish explorers for Saint Clare of Assisi. The valley and the unity later became known as “little Santa Clara” (“Santa Clarita” in the Spanish diminutive) to distinguish it from the Northern Californian city of Santa Clara and its accompanying Mission Santa Clara. The Santa Clarita Valley similarly differentiates itself from the Santa Clara Valley in Northern California. The region was not widely referred to as Santa Clarita until the 1950s; before this, it was unofficially referred to as the “Newhall–Saugus area” and the “Bonelli tract,” after a intimates which owned land in the valley.

History

Pre-Columbian and Spanish colonial eras

The Santa Clarita Valley has been settled for millennia past European arrival. The oldest archaeological site in the area dates urge on to more or less 3000 BC. About AD 450, the Tataviam arrived, displacing the Chumash people who in the past inhabited the area. The Tataviam lived in approximately 20 villages in the valley and surrounding areas including Piru, Agua Dulce, Elizabeth Lake, and Tochonanga.

In the 18th century, Spanish colonists arrived in southern California including Santa Clarita, founding mission settlements. The Mission San Fernando was founded in 1797 in present-day Mission Hills, just 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of downtown Newhall. In 1822, Alta California, which included most of the present-day southwestern United States including whatever of California, became a territory of the newly independent country of Mexico.

The 48,612-acre (196.73 km) Rancho San Francisco land grant was issued by Juan Bautista Alvarado, governor of Alta California, to Mexican army superintendent Antonio del Valle. It was an agricultural area serving the easily reached Mission San Fernando.

1822–1899: Gold discovery, Mentryville, and Henry Mayo Newhall

In 1842, Francisco Lopez discovered gold in Placerita Canyon—the first documented discovery of gold in California. The discovery is commemorated in an 1842 mining claim issued by Governor Alvarado. The Oak of the Golden Dream, which marks the site of the discovery, remains an kinship for tourists. Several places throughout Santa Clarita carry the “Golden Oak” name, including Golden Oak Road in Saugus; Golden Oak Lane, Golden Oak Ranch, and Golden Oak Adult School in Newhall; and Golden Oak Community School in Canyon Country.

The United States acquired California in 1848, after winning the Mexican–American War. The community of Newhall is named after Henry Newhall, an American businessman who made his fortune during the California Gold Rush. He founded the H.M. Newhall & Company, a well-off auction house in San Francisco. Newhall had as well as invested in rail companies that would be neighboring to San Francisco to supplementary cities and became president of the San Francisco and San Jose Railroad. In 1870, he and his buddies sold the company to Southern Pacific Railroad, and he served upon Southern Pacific’s board of directors.

From 1858 to 1861, the Santa Clarita Valley was used as a transportation corridor for the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach serve as part of its first division, stretching from San Francisco to Los Angeles. Two Butterfield Overland Mail stations were located in the area: Lyons Station in Newhall, and King’s Station in San Francisquito Canyon. Beale’s Cut was build up in 1859 through what is now known as the Newhall Pass.

After railroads, Newhall turned to genuine estate and ranching. He purchased a number of the former Spanish and Mexican home grants in the state, amassing a total of 143,000 acres (58,000 ha) between Monterey and Los Angeles counties. The most significant part was the Rancho San Francisco, which he purchased for $2/acre. It became known as Newhall Ranch after Newhall’s death. Within this territory, Newhall decided a right-of-way to Southern Pacific through what is now Newhall Pass. He in addition to sold the railroad allowance of the land, upon which the company built the town of Newhall, founded just north of the present-day intersection of Magic Mountain Parkway and Railroad Avenue. He moved the town south in 1879, and the original townsite was named Saugus, after Henry Newhall’s hometown of Saugus, Massachusetts.

After his death, Newhall’s heirs incorporated the Newhall Land and Farming Company in 1883. Since its founding, it has overseen the go forward of the communities that comprise present-day Santa Clarita, including the master-planned community of Valencia (in which it is headquartered), Canyon Country, Newhall, and Saugus. The company with manages farm house elsewhere in the state.

On September 5, 1876, Charles Crocker, president of the Southern Pacific Company, hammered a ceremonial spike into a railroad tie at Lang Southern Pacific Station in what is now in the distance eastern Canyon Country, marking the ability of the San Joaquin Valley line of the Southern Pacific Railroad, connecting Los Angeles to San Francisco and the burning of the nation for the first time.

In the 1850s and 1860s, businessmen and political leaders such as Andrés Pico, Sanford Lyon, Henry Clay Wiley, Darius Towsley, and Christopher Leaming came to the Santa Clarita Valley for its oil reserves. On September 26, 1876, the town of Mentryville was founded by French immigrant Charles Alexander Mentry close present-day Stevenson Ranch. Mentryville’s Pico Number 4 oil without difficulty was the first commercially booming oil with ease in the western United States. Oil from Mentryville was refined at Pioneer Oil Refinery in Newhall, the first feasible oil refinery in the state. (Pioneer Oil Refinery is currently the without help site on the National Register of Historic Places within the city limits of Santa Clarita.) By the to the fore 1900s, most of Pico Canyon’s richest oil reserves had been depleted, although Pico Number 4 continued to feign until 1990. Many of the abovementioned oil pioneers have lent their names to streets in the valley, such as Pico Canyon Road, Lyons Avenue, Wiley Canyon Road, and Towsley Canyon Road. Drilling continues to occur in Santa Clarita at the Honor Rancho Oil Field and in the area between Placerita Canyon Road and Golden Valley High School.

The Saugus Cafe was traditional in 1886 near the present-day intersection of Railroad Avenue and Magic Mountain Parkway. It is the oldest continuously lively restaurant in Los Angeles County.

1900–1987

Los Angeles studios began filming in Santa Clarita sharply after the twist of the 20th century. Actors in these ahead of time films included William S. Hart, Tom Mix, Harry Carey, and a juvenile John Wayne. Many movie ranches (see section below) were developed in the Santa Clarita Valley. Hart and Carey made their homes in the valley; today both their former estates are operated as county parks.

One major contributor to the valley’s early spread was the Whittaker-Bermite Corporation. From 1934 to 1987, the corporation manufactured, stored, and tested explosives, including bullets and bottle rockets, on a 996-acre site south of Soledad Canyon Road, east of Railroad Avenue, northeast of the Circle J Ranch community, southwest of Centre Pointe Parkway, and west of Golden Valley Road. The first housing tract in the area consisted of company homes along Walnut Street in Newhall. In highly developed times, the California Department of Toxic Substances Control has made efforts to tidy the area of perchlorate and further toxic chemicals left in back by decades of munitions testing. Today, the area persists as a gap in the urban move forward of Santa Clarita.

The Santa Clarita Valley was the scene of the second deadliest mishap in California’s history, known as the “worst civil engineering failure of the 20th century.” Shortly in the past midnight on March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam collapsed. Water from the St. Francis Reservoir coursed through San Francisquito Canyon and the Santa Clara River in a wave up to 140 feet (43 m) high and 2 miles (3.2 km) wide, destroying buildings in its path. By the period the floodwaters reached the Pacific Ocean near Ventura five hours later, 411 people had died. Some buildings in Newhall became makeshift morgues. After the disaster, engineer William Mulholland resigned from his incline as bureaucrat of the Los Angeles Bureau of Water Works and Supply (now the Department of Water and Power).

On December 27, 1936, United Airlines Trip 34 crashed into a hilltop in Rice Canyon which is near Newhall, killing anything twelve people upon board.

In 1945, the Santa Clarita Union High School District was created. The considering year it was renamed William S. Hart Union High School District after William S. Hart. The district’s first tall school was William S. Hart High School in Newhall.

The first credited use of the name “Santa Clarita” in a housing press on appeared in the Rancho Santa Clarita housing tract in Saugus, built in 1947.

On September 17, 1966, William V. Fowler, Grand Cyclops (leader) of the California Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, organized a reactivation rally in Soledad Canyon, on Capra Road nearly 2 miles (3.2 km) east of the present-day Soledad Canyon Road exit on State Route 14. Fowler sought to reactivate the KKK in California, where it was banned by take steps since 1946. Estimates of the rally’s size range from 30 to 100 people, far fewer than the 5,000 to 10,000 Fowler expected. The rally took place on United States Forest Service property and included a con cross burning. Just one person was arrested at the rally — for assaulting a police executive he mistook for a Klansman.

On April 5, 1970, four CHP officers were shot dead by two heavily armed career criminals at a Standard Gas Station in present-day Valencia. The shootout was the deadliest attack upon law enforcement in California history. As Valencia had barely been developed, it came to be known as the Newhall incident. One of the perpetrators was sentenced to cartoon in prison; the other enthusiastic suicide. In the aftermath of the incident, policing was transformed nationwide—police training and weaponry were bigger and bullet proof vests became widespread.

In the early daylight of July 23, 1982, a helicopter crash occurred at the Indian Dunes amusement park in Valencia during the making of Twilight Zone: The Movie, killing three people.

1987–present: City of Santa Clarita

After multiple futile attempts to form a city and at least two unproductive attempts to form a remove county, residents of the Santa Clarita Valley finally incorporated the City of Santa Clarita on December 15, 1987. The proposal passed by a margin of two to one in that year’s general election. Other proposed names for the city were “City of the Canyons” and “La Mancha” (“blemish” in Spanish); “Santa Clarita” narrowly defeated “City of the Canyons.” The city’s first mayor was innovative Congressman Buck McKeon.

In 1990, the federal management awarded Cemex a pact to mine millions of tons of sand and gravel in Soledad Canyon, just east of the city. The proposed mine caused controversy due to its potential for let breathe pollution, traffic congestion, and environmental damage to the Angeles National Forest and Santa Clara River. The city of Santa Clarita fought for decades to prevent mining in the canyon. In 2019, the Interior Board of Land Appeals (part of the United States Department of the Interior) upheld a 2015 decision by the Bureau of Land Management, permanently preventing Cemex from mining in Soledad Canyon. Cemex had never mined any sand or gravel in the canyon.

Santa Clarita was devastated by the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The Newhall Pass alternating of I-5 and CA-14 collapsed, and Sierra Highway became the abandoned route in and out of the valley; Sierra Highway was soon closed as well. Several surface streets throughout the city were closed due to structural damage. The Four Corners oil spill led to contamination of the Santa Clara River. Electricity was temporarily shut off for the whole valley, and schools were closed. Shelters opened in Newhall, Saugus, and Canyon Country. The National Guard was sent to the area, and City Hall was temporarily relocated. Water distribution points were set stirring as residents lost entrance to management water. The city suffered an estimated $76.8 million in damages.

Santa Clarita was ranked in 2006 by Money magazine as 18th of the 100 best places to live in the United States.

On November 14, 2019, a addition shooting occurred at Saugus High School. That morning, Nathaniel Berhow, a 16-year-old junior at the school, used a semi-automatic pistol to shoot five additional students, killing two of them, before turning his gun upon himself. The shooting lasted 16 seconds. Survivors were reunited gone their parents at genial Central Park, and insulted students were sent to Henry Mayo Hospital in Valencia and Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills. The shooter succumbed to his self-inflicted injuries the next day in the hospital. A vigil reverence the victims was held at Central Park the next day.

In the 21st century, the city’s developed Place has expanded significantly as Lennar, Tri Pointe Homes, and KB Home have build up housing developments in the area. Recent developments within the city limits include Five Knolls, Aliento, Skyline Ranch, Vista Canyon, West Creek, West Hills, River Village, and Toll Brothers at Plum Canyon; just external the city, the large FivePoint Valencia subdivision is in construction. Some of these developments, such as River Village, Villa Metro, and Five Knolls, were build up near the city center, while others were build up near the city’s edges and future annexed into the city.

Geography

Santa Clarita, according to the United States Census Bureau, covers an area of 70.82 square miles (183.4 km), of which 70.75 square miles (183.2 km2) is home and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km) (0.10%) is water. Nearly half of the city’s land Place has been acquired via annexations; the city’s Place at the become old of interest was just 39.09 square miles (101.2 km2). The Newhall Pass is located at the southern decline of the city, south of Newhall and north of the San Fernando Valley communities of Granada Hills and Sylmar.

Santa Clarita lies within the Santa Clarita Valley, bounded by the San Gabriel Mountains to the east, the Santa Susana Mountains to the south and west, and the Sierra Pelona Mountains to the north, all allocation of the Transverse Ranges.

The broad Santa Clara River passes through the city from east to west. Though usually dry, the river exhibits significant surface flow during seasonal episodes of oppressive rainfall. The river’s numerous tributaries incise the hilly terrain of the valley to form steep canyons after which many of the city’s major streets are named. The largest of these canyons are Bouquet Canyon, San Francisquito Canyon, Sand Canyon, and Soledad Canyon.

City limits

Currently, the city is bounded by Interstate 5 to the west, extending east to tote up almost whatever developed areas of the Santa Clarita Valley east of the freeway. Part of the city’s eastern boundary follows California State Route 14, although the city limits extend on top of Route 14 to tote up the communities of Aliento, Fair Oaks Ranch, Vista Canyon, and Sand Canyon; the Plaza at Golden Valley shopping center; and the Whitney Canyon, Elsmere Canyon, Golden Valley Ranch, Walker Ranch, and East Walker Ranch right of entry spaces. Santa Clarita extends as in the distance east as the eastern fall of Shenandoah Lane, east of Shadow Pines Boulevard in Canyon Country. The city limits also tally up a little exclave west of Interstate 5 in Towsley Canyon Park. The Angeles National Forest forms part of the city’s northern and eastern boundaries, although parts of northern Saugus (north of Copper Hill Drive and Haskell Canyon Road) and Canyon Country (south of Placerita and Sand Canyon Roads) extend into the national forest.

Topography

The approved elevation of the city is 1,207 feet (368 m), the height of the historic Newhall Airport which was northwest of Via Princessa and Railroad Avenue from the 1930s through the 1950s. Elevation varies substantially throughout the city. The lowest narrowing in Santa Clarita is near the junction of CA-126 and I-5 (34°26′32″N 118°36′10″W / 34.4422°N 118.6029°W / 34.4422; -118.6029), at an height of 1,024 feet (312 m). The highest lessening is in the San Gabriel Mountains south of Placerita and Sand Canyon Roads (34°21′36″N 118°24′22″W / 34.3599°N 118.4062°W / 34.3599; -118.4062) at an height above sea level of 3,048 feet (929 m). Most populated areas in the city are 1,100–1,700 feet (340–520 m) above sea level. The highest residential areas of Canyon Country, north of Skyline Ranch Road and east of Shadow Pines Boulevard, exceed 2,000 feet (610 m).

Geology

Santa Clarita is close the San Fernando oddity zone and has been affected by the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and 1994 Northridge earthquake (see above), both of which had epicenters in the San Fernando Valley.

Climate

Santa Clarita experiences hot, very teetotal summers and cool winters with moderate precipitation. Due to its near proximity to the Mojave Desert (High Desert) and Pacific Ocean, and the city’s broad range of elevations, varying micro-climates are common. There is a large degree of diurnal temperature variation, especially in the summer. According to the Köppen climate classification, Santa Clarita experiences a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Csa).

During the summer, hot weather is predominant once occasional high humidity and cumulus buildups on zenith of the later terrain surrounding the valley. Thunderstorms occasionally occur during influxes of monsoonal moisture in the summer as capably as during Pacific storms in the winter. The warmest months are July and August, though summer-like temperatures can occur even in May and October. During this time, average tall temperatures are in the 90s Fahrenheit (32–38 °C), but can rise to capably over 100 °F (38 °C) during heat waves. Temperatures have reached 115 °F (46 °C) as recently as September 6, 2020. Winters are mild, with temperatures dropping below freezing occasionally on sure winter nights. Rain falls primarily from December through March; snow is scarce but can fall in small quantities during the winter; in fact, snowfall was reported in in advance 2023. Santa Clarita lies within USDA reforest hardiness zone 9b, except for a little portion of southern Newhall which is in zone 10a. Santa Clarita’s average temperatures are more extreme than in downtown Los Angeles but less extreme than in the Antelope Valley.

Wildfires

Characterized by temperate hills covered in brush and chaparral, Santa Clarita is susceptible to wildfires. Although wildfires are most common in summer and fall, they can occur throughout the year during drought conditions, such as in December 2017. Wildfire risk is highest afterward Santa Ana winds blow through the Place from the Mojave Desert.

Notable wildfires in the Santa Clarita Valley attach the Rye Fire, Buckweed Fire, Sand Fire, and Tick Fire.

Ecology

Santa Clarita is located along the boundary along with the WWF-designated California coastal sage and chaparral ecoregion to the southwest, and California montane chaparral and woodlands ecoregion to the northeast.

Cityscape

Although generally considered a large suburb of Greater Los Angeles, the city of Santa Clarita consists of four positive communities: Canyon Country, Newhall, Saugus, and Valencia. Each community is characterized by a combination of single-family homes, townhomes, apartment buildings, condominiums, and classified ad and industrial areas. Valencia, a master-planned community, contains the city’s largest shopping center (Westfield Valencia Town Center) and most of the city’s corporate headquarters, government buildings, hotels, and tallest buildings. The neighborhoods in Canyon Country and Saugus are characterized by a broad age range, from older developments dating from the 1960s or earlier to supplementary developments built in the 21st century. Newhall, the oldest Place of the city, has plus experienced new personal ad and industrial development. Throughout the city, single-family suburban tract housing predominates, with apartment and condominium complexes along major thoroughfares. Many communities in Santa Clarita, especially in newer areas, have homeowner associations, and some are gated. Placerita Canyon and Sand Canyon are equestrian communities gone large custom ranch homes.

Communities just external the city limits tote up Agua Dulce, Castaic, Stevenson Ranch, unincorporated Valencia, and Val Verde. All residents of the Santa Clarita Valley, both inside and external the city, may use either their neighborhood or “Santa Clarita” for their mailing addresses.

The neighborhoods of Santa Clarita are absentmindedly defined, and in some cases, sources conflict upon their boundaries. For example, some sources add together Arroyo Seco Junior High School in Valencia, while extra sources place it in Saugus. The Place of Newhall’s 91321 ZIP code north of Golden Valley Road is often considered allocation of Canyon Country.

Demographics

Historically, Santa Clarita’s population has been predominantly non-Hispanic White. Starting in the 1960s and continuing into the 1990s, white Americans, primary those from affluent backgrounds, began migrating from Los Angeles to suburban cities such as Santa Clarita, Calabasas, Malibu, Thousand Oaks, and Camarillo. However, from 1980s onward, the city’s population has become increasingly diverse. The non-Hispanic White percentage of the population has dropped from 80.6% in 1990 to 44.5% in 2020. The total White population (including those of Hispanic heritage) has proportionately decreased from 97.2% in 1970 to 50.8% in 2020. Nevertheless, non-Hispanic Whites remain the largest ethnic charity in the city, and Santa Clarita’s non-Hispanic white percentage is beyond the California statewide average of 34.7%, but humiliate than the national average of 57.8%.

Santa Clarita’s population mass rate has historically outpaced county, state, and national averages. In 2019, Santa Clarita was ranked 20th out of 515 U.S. cities in population and economic growth, and was second along with California cities. During the 2010 census, Santa Clarita was the fourth-largest city in Los Angeles County, however it has since surpassed Glendale as the county’s third-largest city. However, in 2021, the United States Census Bureau estimates showed a 2% decline in the city’s population, in line past the dismount of Los Angeles County. It is the largest city in Los Angeles County north of the Newhall Pass. The city’s median household allowance of $100,932 is higher than both statewide and national averages. ZIP code 91321 (Newhall) is the abandoned ZIP code in the city taking into consideration a median household income under the statewide average.

As in most United States cities, different ethnic groups in Santa Clarita are concentrated in alternating areas. Non-Hispanic whites are present in most areas of the city but are especially dominant in Saugus and Valencia. Canyon Country, Newhall, and Val Verde have large Hispanic populations — some areas with mention to Railroad and Newhall Avenues in Newhall, as without difficulty as Jakes Way in Canyon Country, are in bill to entirely Hispanic. There are significant Asian-American populations in Stevenson Ranch, Valencia, and parts of Saugus and Canyon Country. However, most communities throughout the city are racially mixed. Socioeconomic status furthermore varies throughout the city: the highest median household incomes are found in northern Valencia and Saugus and areas of Canyon Country east of State Route 14, while the lowest median incomes are found near Old Town Newhall and the western and central parts of Canyon Country. As of the 2019-20 intellectual year, the percentage of students at tall schools eligible for release or reduced-price lunch ranged from 13% at Valencia High School to 51.2% at Golden Valley High School.

As a allowance of Los Angeles County, Santa Clarita is located within the Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA metropolitan statistical area and the Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA total statistical area.

2020

As of the 2020 United States census, Santa Clarita had a population of 228,673. The city’s racial makeup was 50.8% white (44.5% non-Hispanic white), 11.7% non-Hispanic Asian American, 4.0% non-Hispanic black or African American, 0.2% non-Hispanic Native American, 0.1% non-Hispanic Pacific Islander, 0.1% non-Hispanics of supplementary races, and 4.5% from two or more races. 34.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Of the city’s 78,586 housing units, 1,894 (2.4%) were vacant.

During the five-year time from 2016 to 2020, the median household pension in Santa Clarita was $100,932, and the median relatives income was $113,304. 9.2% of the city’s population and 5.9% of the families were below the poverty line. As of January 2023, the median house price in Santa Clarita was $739,374 ($785,796 for single-family homes and $522,662 for condos).

Approximately 129,905 residents (56.8% of the city population) lived north of the Santa Clara River, and 98,768 residents (43.2%) lived south of the river.

2019

The 2019 American Community Survey reported that the city’s population was 212,979, and the population of the larger Santa Clarita urban area (including unincorporated Stevenson Ranch, Valencia, and Castaic) was 260,999. The ethnic composition of the city was 72.6% white (47.2% non-Hispanic white), 34.6% Hispanic or Latino (of any race), 10.4% Asian American, 4.9% black or African American, 1.2% Native American, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 8.3% from supplementary races, and 4.0% from two or more races.

20.8% of the city’s population was born external the United States. Among residents 25 years of age and older, 36.9% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. 65.3% of the population 5 years and older spoke and no-one else English at home, while 23.4% spoke Spanish, 3.4% spoke extra Indo-European languages, and 6.1% spoke Asian or Pacific Island languages.

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that Santa Clarita had a population of 176,320. The population density was 3,340.6 inhabitants per square mile (1,289.8/km2). The racial makeup of Santa Clarita was 125,005 (70.9%) White (56.1% Non-Hispanic White), 5,623 (3.2%) African American, 1,013 (0.6%) Native American, 15,025 (8.5%) Asian (3.4% Filipino, 1.7% Korean, 0.8% Indian, 0.8% Chinese, 0.6% Japanese, 0.3% Vietnamese, 0.9% Other Asian), 272 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 21,169 (12.0%) from new races, and 8,213 (4.7%) from two or more races. There were 51,941 people of Hispanic or Latino origin, of any race (29.5% of the population).

The census reported that 174,910 people (99.2% of the population) lived in households, 1,281 (0.7%) lived in non-institutionalized society quarters, and 129 (0.1%) were institutionalized.
There were 59,507 households, out of which 24,677 (41.5%) had kids under the age of 18 perky in them, 34,126 (57.3%) were opposite-sex married couples vivacious together, 6,888 (11.6%) had a female householder in the make public of no husband present, 3,322 (5.6%) had a male householder following no wife present. There were 3,134 (5.3%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 484 (0.8%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 11,634 households (19.6%) were made stirring of individuals, and 4,335 (7.3%) had someone full of life alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94. There were 44,336 families (74.5% of all households); the average intimates size was 3.37.

In terms of age, the population included 46,180 people (26.2%) under the age of 18, 17,565 people (10.0%) aged 18 to 24, 47,788 people (27.1%) aged 25 to 44, 47,936 people (27.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 16,851 people (9.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.

There were 62,055 housing units at an average density of 1,175.7 per square mile (453.9/km), of which 42,335 (71.1%) were owner-occupied, and 17,172 (28.9%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.4%; the rental vacancy rate was 6.0%. 124,532 people (70.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 50,378 people (28.6%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the Census Bureau, Santa Clarita had a median household allowance of $82,607, with 9.5% of the population living under the federal poverty line.

2000

As of the census of 2000, there were 151,088 people, 50,787 households, and 38,242 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,159.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,219.6/km). There were 52,442 housing units at an average density of 1,096.5 per square mile (423.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 79.5% White (69.3% Non-Hispanic White), 20.5% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 8.5% from new races, 5.2% Asian, 3.9% from two or more races, 2.1% African American, 0.6% Native American, and 0.1% Pacific Islander.

There were 50,787 households, out of which 44.4% had children under the age of 18 living bearing in mind them, 61.0% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder like no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 18.7% of whatever households were made occurring of individuals, and 6.1% had someone perky alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.95 and the average family size was 3.38.

In the city, the population was improvement out, with 30.3% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.0 males. For all 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $79,004, and the median income for a relations was $91,450. Males had a median allowance of $53,769 versus $36,835 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,841. 6.4% of the population and 4.7% of families were below the poverty line. 6.7% of those under the age of 18 and 5.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Religion

According to bestplaces.net, 53.4% of Santa Clarita’s population is religious. Christians comprise 50.5% of the city’s population. Of these, 37% are Catholic, 2% are Baptist, 1.8% are Pentecostal, 1.6% are Mormon, 1.2% are Methodist, and 5.2% were further Christians. Among non-Christians, 1.1% of Santa Clarita residents are Jewish, 0.7% are Muslim, are 1.1% follow Eastern religions.

Christianity is the dominant religion in Santa Clarita, and the city has many Christian churches of the Protestant, Catholic, and Mormon denominations — among them are North Oaks Church of Christ, Church of the Canyons, Santa Clarita Baptist Church, The Church of Hope, and Friendly Valley Community Church in Canyon Country; Elevate Church, Village Church, First Presbyterian Church of Newhall, Placerita Bible Church, and Faith Community Church in Newhall; Grace Baptist Church, Saint Kateri Tekakwitha Catholic Church, Bouquet Canyon Church, Calvary Chapel, and Santa Clarita United Methodist Church in Saugus; and Real Life Church, Higher Vision Church, Valencia Hills Community Church, and NorthPark Community Church in Valencia.

Synagogues in Santa Clarita tally up Chabad of Santa Clarita Valley and Temple Beth Ami in Newhall, and Congregation Beth Shalom in Saugus.

There are three mosques in the city: the Islamic Center of Santa Clarita Valley in north Saugus, Unity Center in Newhall, and Al Umma Center of Santa Clarita in Canyon Country.

Homelessness

In June 2020, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority reported 168 homeless people in Santa Clarita, down from 258 in 2019. The Bridge to Home direction provides opinion for homeless people in the valley. Its administrative offices are located upon Newhall Avenue in Newhall, and its client housing shelter is upon Drayton Street in Saugus. Santa Clarita’s percentage of homeless people is low compared to Los Angeles County as a whole.

Government and politics

According to the California Secretary of State, as of February 10, 2019, Santa Clarita has 135,052 registered voters. Of those, 46,096 (34.1%) are registered Democrats, 45,725 (33.9%) are registered Republicans, and 35,764 (26.5%) have declined to own up a embassy party.

In presidential elections, Santa Clarita has historically been a Republican stronghold. However, it has shifted toward the Democratic Party in recent years. Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden won the city in 2016 and 2020, respectively. Santa Clarita remains one of the most conservative cities in Los Angeles County, having voted for Clinton and Biden by much smaller margins than the county and make a clean breast as a whole, both of which are strongly Democratic.

Local government

The City of Santa Clarita is a general play in city and as such is governed by a council–manager form of government. The city council is made occurring of five council members, elected at-large to four-year terms. Each year the council selects one of its members to encourage as mayor, a largely ceremonial position. Mayors are not directly elected. In March 2020, the city council confirmed its ambition to switch to district-based elections, however the transition has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The city hall is located at 23920 Valencia Boulevard, Santa Clarita, CA 91355.

The current elected council

According to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for fiscal year 2019–20, the city’s various funds included $116.3 million in revenues, $112.6 million in expenditures, $1.482 billion in sum assets, and $217.2 million in sum liabilities.

The structure of the processing and coordination of city services

List of mayors

Santa Clarita has had 15 mayors back its incorporation, serving 35 terms.

County, state and federal representation

In the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Santa Clarita is in the 5th district which is represented by Republican Kathryn Barger.

In the United States House of Representatives, Santa Clarita is in California’s 27th congressional district, represented by Republican Mike Garcia.

In the California State Legislature, Santa Clarita is in the 21st Senate District, represented by Republican Scott Wilk, and the California’s 40th State Assembly district, represented by Democrat Pilar Schiavo.

California is represented by US Senators Dianne Feinstein and Alex Padilla, both Democrats.

Education

Elementary schools

Santa Clarita elementary teacher students (grades TK/K-6) are served by four elementary school districts.

These four scholastic districts tally 37 elementary schools and one middle school (Castaic Middle School, administered by Castaic Union School District).

Junior high and high schools

With the exception of Castaic Middle School, all junior tall and high schools (grades 7-12) serving Santa Clarita are part of the William S. Hart Union High School District. The district includes seven general-education tall schools (Canyon, Castaic, Golden Valley, Hart, Saugus, Valencia, and West Ranch) and six general-education junior high schools (Arroyo Seco, La Mesa, Placerita, Rancho Pico, Rio Norte, and Sierra Vista). All Hart District schools are located within Santa Clarita city limits, except for Castaic High School in unincorporated Castaic, and Rancho Pico Junior High and West Ranch High School in unincorporated Stevenson Ranch; however these schools also advance portions of the city. The seven aforementioned high schools in the Hart District compete in the Foothill League supple conference. U.S. News & World Report has ranked Hart District tall schools in the top 12% in the nation. The district’s headquarters are located along Centre Pointe Parkway.

Hart District in addition to includes seven special schools: a center college high school (Academy of the Canyons), on the College of the Canyons campus; the alternative high schools Bowman and Learning Post, with neighboring campuses along Centre Pointe Parkway; Santa Clarita Valley International Charter School (SCVi) in Castaic; the Opportunities for Learning (OFL) charter school, with campuses in Canyon Country and Valencia; and Golden Oak Adult School.

Private schools

Private schools in Santa Clarita count Santa Clarita Christian School, Trinity Classical Academy, Legacy Christian Academy, La Petite Academy, Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, Guidepost Montessori, and Tutor Time. Guidepost Montessori and Tutor Time have two campuses in the city.

Colleges and universities

The city is house to California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), a private art university. Founded in 1961 by Walt Disney, Roy O. Disney, and Nelbert Chouinard, CalArts was the first theoretical or academe created specifically for students of visual and drama arts. It was created by the union of Chouinard Art Institute and the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music. It relocated to its current Valencia campus in 1971, on McBean Parkway near Interstate 5. CalArts has produced numerous well-known actors and musicians including Brad Bird, Tim Burton, Julia Holter, John Lasseter, Marina Rosenfeld, Andrew Stanton, and Carl Stone among others. CalArts is currently administered by president Ravi Rajan.

The Master’s University is a non-denominational, Christian militant arts academe based in the Placerita Canyon neighborhood of Newhall. Founded as Los Angeles Baptist College and Seminary in 1927, it moved to Santa Clarita in 1961 and complex adopted the herald The Master’s College and after that The Master’s University. The university circles also operates The Master’s Seminary in Sun Valley, Los Angeles. The the academy is currently led by Interim President Abner Chou, following the handing over of Dr. Sam Horn in February 2021. John F. MacArthur served as president from 1985 to 2019; he currently serves as chancellor.

College of the Canyons (COC) is a public community researcher with two campuses. The main campus is located in Valencia, at the southwest corner of Rockwell Canyon Road and Valencia Boulevard. The additional Canyon Country campus is located on Sierra Highway in the company of Skyline Ranch Road and Sand Canyon Road. The two COC campuses comprise the Santa Clarita Community College District of California Community Colleges.

Charter College has a campus at the intersection of Soledad Canyon Road and Hidaway Avenue in Canyon Country.

Parks and recreation

Six Flags Magic Mountain

One of the most Famous attractions in the Santa Clarita Valley is the Six Flags Magic Mountain theme park, located just outside the city limits. Six Flags occupies 262 acres of land on the west side of the valley, in unincorporated Valencia. It opened on May 29, 1971, as a press forward of the Newhall Land and Farming Company and SeaWorld Inc. It was sold to Six Flags in 1979. Six Flags Magic Mountain has 20 roller coasters, the most of any amusement park in the world. The park established an estimated 3.365 million visitors in 2017. It is one of 26 Six Flags properties in North America. The park’s property with includes the 25-acre waterpark, Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, which operates from late spring to to the lead fall.

City parks and facilities

Since incorporation, the City of Santa Clarita’s leadership has placed a priority on offering recreational facilities and programs. The city operates a park system which includes 35 parks scattered throughout the city. Many of the parks have lighted basketball and tennis courts as well as baseball, softball, and soccer fields. The largest city park in Santa Clarita is Central Park in Saugus, on the south side of Bouquet Canyon Road, which includes four outside basketball courts; several baseball, softball, and soccer fields; a community garden; disc golf course; cross country course; and the Central Bark dog park.

The George A. Caravalho Sports Complex, located near the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Centre Pointe Parkway in Canyon Country, includes a gymnasium gone two indoor, full-sized basketball courts, four pickleball courts, two volleyball courts, two futsal courts, and four racquetball courts. The Sports Complex includes the City of Santa Clarita Activities Center (a.k.a. The Centre) which contains rooms for banquets and meetings. The Sports Complex afterward includes the Santa Clarita Aquatic Center, which includes three large swimming pools and several water slides; the Trek Bike Park of Santa Clarita covering 7 acres including BMX and mountain biking trails; the Santa Clarita Skate Park; and the Canine Country dog park. Many of the city’s recreational programs are held at the Sports Complex.

Over the following several years, the city has cosponsored a summer concert series in cooperation following various local businesses. These concerts, offering a variety of musicians, are offered pardon of combat and take place on weekends in Central Park. The concert was canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The city offers a broad variety of fee-based and free classes and programs in a variety of locations throughout the year.

The city operates two community centers: the Newhall Community Center, adjacent to the Newhall Metrolink station; and the Canyon Country Community Center (CCCC), at the northeast corner of Sierra Highway and Soledad Canyon Road. The Canyon Country Community Center was located at Sierra Highway and Flying Tiger Drive in the past its relocation in October 2021.

City-sponsored recreational programs are listed in the quarterly magazine Seasons, which is delivered to whatever residences within the city limits via mail.

The Santa Clarita Marathon is an annual race through the city’s streets and paseos. First rule in 1995, it is now considered a qualifying race for the Boston Marathon. Previously held in November, starting in 2022 it was for eternity moved to February. Both the 2020 and 2022 marathons were null and void due to the COVID-19 pandemic; there was no 2021 marathon.

Santa Clarita was picked to host stages in the AMGEN Tour of California for a sum of 9 years. It has hosted a sum of 14 stages as of 2019.

Surrounded by three mountain ranges, the Santa Clarita area contains numerous hiking trails, in areas such as Agua Dulce Canyon, Central Park, East Walker Ranch, Elsmere Canyon, Golden Valley Ranch, Newhall Pass Open Space, Haskell Canyon Open Space, Quigley Canyon, East Canyon, Fish Canyon, San Francisquito Open Space, Tapia Canyon, Towsley Canyon, and Wildwood Canyon.

County parks

The Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation operates one park within the city of Santa Clarita, and two others within the city’s sphere of influence.

William S. Hart Regional Park in Newhall includes the land of silent film star William S. Hart, known as La Loma de los Vientos (The Hill of the Winds) and has hosted the annual Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival in the past 1994. The William S. Hart Museum, one of three Natural History Museums of Los Angeles County, is located on the grounds of Hart Park. It is the deserted Los Angeles County park located within the Santa Clarita city limits.

Placerita Canyon State Park is in an unincorporated area east of Newhall, in the western San Gabriel foothills upon the southeast side of the Santa Clarita Valley. It is administered by the Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation, in partnership similar to California State Parks. It features eight hiking trails, equestrian trails, waterfalls, the Oak of the Golden Dream, and the Walker Cabin. Its visitor center, known as Placerita Canyon Nature Center includes exhibits and descriptions of the natural world of the region.

Tesoro Adobe Historic Park was the house of actor Harry Carey, and has been described as “the first tourist likeness in Santa Clarita.” It is located in the unincorporated community of Tesoro del Valle, at the northernmost lessening in Valencia. In June 2005, Montalvo Properties LLC, the developer of Tesoro del Valle, donated the park to Los Angeles County.

Other

The city is house to an ice rink known as The Cube—Ice and Entertainment Center (formerly Ice Station Valencia). It is used for ice skating and hockey. In 2020, Ice Station Valencia was upon the brink of enduring closure due to COVID-19, until the city council unanimously voted to acquire the building for $14.2 million. On February 23, 2021, the city council sold Ice Station to American Sports Entertainment Company and the Los Angeles Kings. The city is currently in the process of renovating The Cube to put in two large ice rinks (one NHL-size rink and one Olympic-sized rink) and one small ice rink known as The Pond. The rinks, covered subsequently insulated floors, would double as venues for conventions, business meetings, concerts, birthday parties, and filming. The Cube opened on April 12, 2021, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. It is the home arena for the UCLA Bruins men’s ice hockey team and is located along Smyth Drive in Valencia, across the street from Valencia High School.

MB2 Entertainment, previously known as Mountasia Family Fun Center, is an entertainment and recreation center located in Saugus, along Golden Triangle Road (a frontage road of Soledad Canyon Road) near its intersection behind Golden Oak Road. It first opened in August 1995, and currently offers miniature golf, go-karts, bumper boats, laser tag, and video games. On March 15, 2020, it was forced to near due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In September, after approximately six months of closure, the owners sold the center. MB2 Group, which operates go-kart racing tracks, purchased the center in February 2021.

Sports

Santa Clarita does not have any sports teams in the NBA, MLB, NFL, or NHL. The professional teams in Los Angeles and Anaheim (specifically, the Clippers and Lakers of the NBA, the Angels and Dodgers of MLB, the Chargers and Rams of the NFL, and Ducks and Kings of the NHL) are popular among Santa Clarita residents. The scholastic sports teams of The Master’s University and College of the Canyons, as capably as the sports teams in the valley’s seven tall schools, have some later than among the people of Santa Clarita.

The Santa Clarita Blue Heat is a women’s soccer team in the United Women’s Soccer league. It was founded as the Ventura County Fusion in 2008 and played in the city of Ventura since relocating to Santa Clarita. Their house games are played at The Master’s University. Santa Clarita as a consequence hosts FC Santa Clarita (also known as the Santa Clarita Storm) of the United Premier Soccer League, a momentum league. The team was founded in 2006 as the Lancaster Rattlers before upsetting to Santa Clarita. Like the Blue Heat, FC Santa Clarita plays its home games at The Master’s University.

The Canyons Aquatic Club is a competitive swim team based in Santa Clarita affiliated later than USA Swimming. Its home pool is located at College of the Canyons, with practice locations at the Santa Clarita Aquatics Center, Santa Clarita Park, Castaic Aquatic Center, North Oaks Park, and Newhall Park.

The Saugus Speedway, located along Soledad Canyon Road in Saugus, is a 0.33-mile (0.53 km) race track covering 35 acres (14 ha). It first opened in 1939 as Bonelli Stadium. The first increase car racing event upon the speedway occurred in 1957. In 1995, the track was each time closed. The speedway continues to promote as the venue for the Santa Clarita Swap Meet every Sunday.

Central Park contains a 3.1-mile (5.0 km) cross country course used by high school and educational athletes to train and race.

The city includes four golf courses: Vista Valencia Golf Course and Valencia Country Club in Valencia, and Sand Canyon Country Club and Friendly Valley Golf Course in Canyon Country. The Oaks Club at Valencia is located in the Westridge Place of Stevenson Ranch, adjacent to the city.

The Canyon Country Little League baseball and softball teams play in their games on a sports ground along Sierra Highway in unincorporated Canyon Country.

Services

Law enforcement

Santa Clarita is a pact city, meaning it does not have its own police department and otherwise relies on county services. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) operates the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station at 26201 Golden Valley Road, just south of the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Centre Pointe Parkway. Prior to its October 2021 relocation, the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station was located on Magic Mountain Parkway in Valencia.

The California Highway Patrol’s Newhall office patrols the highways and streets of the Santa Clarita Valley. Despite monster referred to as the Newhall office, its headquarters are actually located in unincorporated Valencia, along The Old Road just south of State Route 126. Its service Place covers 772 square miles (2,000 km), including most of northwestern Los Angeles County, containing 204 miles (328 km) of freeways and 296 miles (476 km) of unincorporated roadways.

Water

Santa Clarita receives its water from the Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency, also known as SCV Water. The agency was formed upon January 1, 2018, through the union of three agencies: Castaic Lake Water Agency, Newhall County Water District, and the Valencia Water Company. The agency’s service Place covers roughly 195 square miles (510 km2) and is house to 273,000 people. It is split into three water divisions—Santa Clarita, Newhall, and Valencia—descendants of the three indigenous agencies. Its headquarters, adjacent to Central Park in Saugus, include a college garden and learning middle with higher than 350 plant species. The SCV Water Agency sources its water from the California Aqueduct, Castaic Lake, alluvial wells, and the Saugus Aquifer. The SCV Water Agency is currently operational in removing hazardous material from the Saugus Aquifer left at the back by decades of munitions study at the Whittaker-Bermite site (see History section above).

The Los Angeles Aqueduct passes through Santa Clarita upon its pretension from the Owens Valley to Granada Hills, Los Angeles. It passes adjacent to, and is visible from, Saugus High School and the Centre Pointe Business Park. However, Santa Clarita does not receive Los Angeles Aqueduct water–all of the aqueduct’s water goes to the city of Los Angeles.

Public libraries

The city operates the Santa Clarita Public Library system, consisting of three libraries: the main office in Valencia, the Old Town Newhall Library in Newhall, and the Jo Anne Darcy Library in Canyon Country. The libraries have enough money books ranging from preschool to adult reading levels. In addition, each library has a variety of facilities for students, teachers, and house schoolers, including homework help, mental health, and employment resources, as with ease as community events. Passport answer services are plus offered at each library branch. In auxiliary to its three properties, the system includes an eLibrary. The main office in Valencia has a sculpture that says “IMAG NE”; when a person stands amid the G and the N the word “IMAGINE” is spelled.

Health services

Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital (commonly referred to as Henry Mayo Hospital), founded in 1975, is a Level II trauma middle and hospital. It includes 357 beds, as without difficulty as a helipad, an urgent care center, inpatient facilities, a catheterization lab, a breast imaging center, disaster resource center, outpatient surgery center, and cardiac rehabilitation center. It is located in Valencia, along McBean Parkway at its intersections similar to Avenida Navarre and Orchard Village Road. The rarefied which contains Henry Mayo Hospital after that includes medical institutions not affiliated similar to the hospital, such as Valencia Perinatal Services, Advanced Pain Management, UCLA Health, and an office of Heritage Sierra Medical Group. Henry Mayo along with runs a fitness center along Town Center Drive, about 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the hospital.

Santa Clarita is as well as served by private health care providers such as Exer Urgent Care, Facey Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente, Concentra Urgent Care, and Providence Health & Services.

As share of Los Angeles County, Santa Clarita is under the jurisdiction of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. It does not have its own public health agency.

Electricity and gas

Santa Clarita does not have its own electricity or natural gas utilities. The city’s electricity comes from Southern California Edison, and its natural gas comes from SoCalGas.

Fire

The city contracts taking into consideration the Los Angeles County Fire Department for flame protection. The agency has eleven ember stations in the city of Santa Clarita, as competently as one station in unincorporated Valencia, two in unincorporated Castaic, one in Val Verde, one in Stevenson Ranch, and one in Agua Dulce.

Post offices

The United States Postal Service operates four reveal offices in the city: at Creekside Road and McBean Parkway in central Valencia, on Tournament Road in southern Valencia, at Lyons and Peachland Avenues in Newhall, and at Soledad Canyon Road east of Sierra Highway in Canyon Country. Two declare offices are located in the Santa Clarita Valley just uncovered the city limits, at The Old Road and Towsley Canyon Road in unincorporated Newhall, and upon Franklin Parkway in the Valencia Commerce Center. There is also a Contract Postal Unit located in the Saugus Drugs stock at Bouquet and Haskell Canyon Roads.

Other

The California Department of Motor Vehicles has an office in Newhall, at the southwest corner of Lyons Avenue and Newhall Avenue, serving the complete Santa Clarita Valley.

Crime

Santa Clarita has a relatively low crime rate. The city’s violent crime rate is roughly one-third of the national average and 29% of the California statewide average. In 2020, the home security site Safety ranked Santa Clarita the seventh-safest city in California, specifically mentioning the low property crime rate. Then-mayor Cameron Smyth ascribed this to the “diligence” of the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station.

Nevertheless some of the poorer neighborhoods of Santa Clarita have struggled next crime. The apartment and condominium complexes along Jakes Way in Canyon Country (south of the Santa Clara River, east of Sierra Highway, north of the Metrolink railroad line, and west of State Route 14) have seen some of the highest crime rates in the city. Gangs such as Brown Familia and Newhall 13 are supple in parts of Canyon Country and Newhall.

Notable criminal incidents that have made news about Santa Clarita have included some racist and bigoted acts adjoining Black, Latino, and Jewish residents in the midst of others. Many of these residents have banded together to fight against racist and bigoted acts. Other later incidents have included a shootout in 1970 known as the Newhall incident, the Stevenson Ranch shootout in 2001, and the Saugus High School shooting in 2019.

Economy

Companies based in Santa Clarita total Princess Cruises, Honda Performance Development, Precision Dynamics Corporation, condomman.com, Newhall Land and Farming Company, HASA, and the American disaffection of Advanced Bionics. Sunkist, Mechanix Wear, Remo, and WayForward are headquartered just outdoor the city in unincorporated Valencia.

Largest employers

According to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2020, here are the summit employers in the city.

Shopping and personal ad centers

Westfield Valencia Town Center

The largest shopping center in Santa Clarita is the Westfield Valencia Town Center. This large shopping mall owned by Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield occupies an area bounded by Valencia Boulevard to the south, McBean Parkway to the west, Magic Mountain Parkway to the north, and Citrus Street to the east. It includes beyond 1,000,000 square feet (93,000 m2) of retail heavens and contains 134 stores and 46 restaurants. Anchor stores include Macy’s, JCPenney, H&M, Gold’s Gym, and Forever 21; there is next a Regal Edwards movie theater. Town Center Drive circles the interior of the mall. Westfield Valencia Town Center and the surrounding area functions as one of the city’s major event districts — within the Place are the headquarters of Princess Cruises, the Santa Clarita City Hall, Santa Clarita Courthouse, Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station, and Santa Clarita Valley Medical Plaza. Six of the city’s ten tallest buildings, including the three tallest, are in or adjacent to the Town Center; the two tallest buildings are 24305 Town Center Drive (headquarters of Princess Cruises) and the Hyatt Regency Valencia, both of which are 72 feet (22 m) tall. Most of the city’s car dealerships are just north of the Town Center, near Magic Mountain Parkway, Creekside Road, and Auto Center Drive.

Old Town Newhall

The historic district of Old Town Newhall (aka. Downtown Newhall) is a major cultural and event center. It contains many independent restaurants, stores, and theaters, as capably as a public library. Notable businesses in Old Town Newhall augment Newhall Refinery (a gastropub), Newhall Press Room, The Old Town Junction, Brewery Draconum, Jazmin’s Bakery, Commando Military Surplus, Pulchella Winery, National Glass, The Schiitr (a house audio store), Placerita Liquor, Santa Clarita Valley Food Pantry, and Hotel Lexen. The areas surrounding Old Town Newhall are predominantly Hispanic, and there are many Mexican restaurants including La Charrita, El Pueblo, El Taco Llama, and El Pariente. Theaters in Old Town Newhall count up Canyon Theater Guild, The Main, and Laemmle. The Old Town Newhall Farmers Market is located upon the grounds of the public library. Other notable sites in the area include the William S. Hart Park; Newhall DMV; Newhall Elementary School (part of the Newhall School District); Newhall Metrolink station; Newhall Terrace, Newhall Crossings, and Californian apartment complexes; Veterans Historical Plaza; First Presbyterian Church of Newhall; Unity Center mosque; Newhall Community Center; and the historic Saugus Train Station (Heritage Junction). The certified Old Town Newhall website describes it as “Santa Clarita’s premier arts and entertainment district.” The Hart and Main wedding and event venue is scheduled to admittance in spring 2022. Some of the recent developments in Old Town Newhall have been described as gentrification.

Others

Numerous shopping centers are scattered throughout the city along major thoroughfares. These shopping centers enhance both chain stores and small businesses.

Industrial centers

Santa Clarita includes several industrial areas and office parks.

The Valencia Industrial Center is the largest concern park in the Santa Clarita Valley, with 11,000,000 square feet (1,000,000 m) of office space. Stretching from Valencia High School to the I-5/CA-126 interchange, it includes the headquarters of the Saugus Union School District and The Santa Clarita Valley Signal, offices of Advanced Bionics, Aerospace Dynamics International, Woodward, and ATK Audiotek, and supplementary businesses such as The Home Depot, Smart and Final, Pocock Brewing Company, O’Connor Photography, Marriott and Hilton hotels, Forrest Machining, Office Depot, and The Cube Ice and Entertainment Center. Rye Canyon Business Park and Southern California Innovation Park, just north of the Valencia Industrial Center, are home to a Walmart Supercenter, Scooter’s Jungle, Boston Scientific Corporation, Legacy Volleyball Club, Trinity Classical Academy, and the city’s transit allowance facility.

The Centre Pointe Business Park is located close the city’s geographic center, south of Soledad Canyon Road upon both sides of Golden Valley Road. It includes the Centre Pointe Village and Centre Pointe Marketplace shopping centers, with tenants such as Sam’s Club, Walmart, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Ashley HomeStore, Jo-Ann, Spirit Halloween, Rattler’s Bar B Que, Bank of America, and Starbucks; other businesses such as the Country Antique Fair Mall, Mountasia Family Fun Center, operations knack of John Paul Mitchell Systems, Bocchi Laboratories, Top Out Climbing Gym, Home Depot, Pep Boys, and several body shops; Bowman High School; and the William S. Hart Union High School District headquarters.

Other industrial areas in the city tote up Saugus Station, on the east side of Railroad Avenue; Valencia Corporate Center, on Tourney Road just east of Interstate 5; Needham Ranch, on Sierra Highway south of Newhall Avenue; and Vista Canyon, on Lost Canyon Road west of Sand Canyon Road. The unincorporated Place of Valencia west of Interstate 5 moreover contains several situation parks, such as the Valencia Commerce Center.

Media

The City of Santa Clarita and surrounding communities are served by several local media organizations.

Newspapers

Santa Clarita is served by the Los Angeles Daily News and The Santa Clarita Valley Signal. The Daily News primarily focuses on news, sports and entertainment stories in the city of Los Angeles and adjacent areas, but in addition to covers Santa Clarita periodically. Daily News circulation numbers within the Santa Clarita Valley are not known.

The Santa Clarita Valley Signal

The primary daily newspaper, The Santa Clarita Valley Signal, was founded in 1919. In 2012, it had a weekday circulation of 10,454 and a Sunday circulation of 11,598. Until 2018, the newspaper focused nearly exclusively on local news, sports, entertainment and features. In October 2016, the Signal moved its headquarters from Creekside Road in Valencia to Diamond Place near Centre Pointe Parkway; since October 2021, it has been headquartered on Avenue Stanford in the Valencia Industrial Center.

From 1979 to 2016, the Signal was owned by Morris Multimedia which is a company based in Savannah, Georgia. In 2016, Morris Multimedia sold the Signal to Paladin Multi-Media Group. In June 2018, Richard and Chris Budman purchased Paladin and began to name a new pardon Sunday magazine, featuring a column by editor-in-chief Tim Whyte below the byline “Black and Whyte”. According to an October 9, 2018 article in the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR), the extra management led to a conservative shift in the paper’s editorial stance, which prompted a help of progressives in the Santa Clarita Valley to Begin their own news outlet, the Proclaimer.

Radio

The primary radio station serving the Santa Clarita Valley is the Hometown Station, or KHTS. KHTS broadcasts upon FM 98.1 and AM 1220. The KHTS transmitters are located along Sierra Highway in unincorporated northern Canyon Country, and its studios have been in Old Town Newhall before June 2015. KHTS was founded as KBET in 1984 and was renamed KIIS and cutting edge KHTS. KHTS is a full-service station—it covers local news, including chat shows, high university and literary sports, as capably as professional sports in the Los Angeles area.

The region is furthermore served by FM-101.5 KZNQ-LP, Santa Clarita’s first local FM radio station. It features a non-profit country music format owned and is operated by Santa Clarita Public Broadcasters Corporation, transmitting from Round Mountain in the city of Santa Clarita in the past 2015.

In accessory to KHTS and KZNQ-LP, Santa Clarita and its surrounding communities are indirectly served by a number of major shout from the rooftops Los Angeles FM and AM radio stations.

There are as a consequence several other Internet-based radio stations that minister to the public in the Santa Clarita Valley.

Television

All local programming for Santa Clarita is carried on a single public-access television cable TV channel, which is operated by SCVTV, a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation. It is simple to Spectrum Cable customers throughout the Santa Clarita Valley upon Channel 20 and to AT&T U-verse customers below local programming (Channel 99/Santa Clarita). SCVTV carries public, educational and direction programming, including Santa Clarita City Council and Planning Commission meetings, history shows, high studious and speculative news programs, talk shows, football games, and extra programs of local interest. SCVTV afterward runs the local news website scvnews.com and the history website scvhistory.com. scvhistory.com contains chronicles of the Santa Clarita Valley Historical Society.

There are no advertisement over-the-air television stations in the Santa Clarita Valley. The city is share of the Los Angeles media market. Digital signals from the Los Angeles stations are available on local cable television systems, DirecTV, and Dish Network.

Podcasts

Local podcast studios serving the Santa Clarita Valley include Podcast SCV and Arcay Studios.

Magazines

Magazines serving the Santa Clarita Valley include Seasons (which covers city-sponsored recreational programs), élite, Santa Clarita Magazine, and Inside SCV.

Transportation

Highways

Bus service

City of Santa Clarita Transit, formerly known conveniently as Santa Clarita Transit, provides extensive bus support within the Santa Clarita Valley and to/from North Hollywood in the San Fernando Valley. City of Santa Clarita Transit is operated by MV Transportation, under contract past the city of Santa Clarita.

On weekdays, City of Santa Clarita Transit operates commuter buses to/from Union Station in downtown Los Angeles and North Hollywood Station (operating seven days per week as the “NoHo Express/757”), allowing riders to entry Metro Los Angeles short transit subway and vivacious rail services, as capably as Warner Center, Burbank, Van Nuys, Century City, and UCLA. During the summer, the city provides a limited express assist to the Santa Monica Pier.

On weekdays when theoretical is in session, City of Santa Clarita Transit operates supplemental school-day service taking into account routes and scheduled stops designed on the subject of various schools within the Santa Clarita Valley.

City of Santa Clarita Transit as well as operates Dial-A-Ride abet for seniors and the disabled. The assist allows for pick-up and drop-off at any address within the City of Santa Clarita and within a three-quarter mile radius of the nearest unconditional route bus stop in unincorporated areas.

City of Santa Clarita Transit operates weekdays from 4:55 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Saturdays from 6:30 a.m.-9:45 p.m., and upon Sundays from 7:15 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Service operates as frequently as all 10 minutes during pinnacle periods to all 85 minutes during off-peak hours. Typically buses operate every 25 to 60 minutes.

Rail

Metrolink provides commuter passenger train support to the Santa Clarita Valley along its Antelope Valley Line which runs from Lancaster to Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, where transfers can be made to destinations in Southern California and the on fire of the nation. There are three Metrolink stations in the city: Via Princessa in Canyon Country, Santa Clarita station in Saugus (near the geographic center of the city), and Newhall station in Newhall. All stations have large parking lots to permit commuters to park and ride. An additional Metrolink station known as Vista Canyon is slated for construction in Canyon Country, east of the current Via Princessa station. Metrolink relieve operates 7 days a week, with reduced service on Saturdays and Sundays.

Bicycle and walking

There are a series of bike trails and walking paths threaded throughout the city. Bicyclists can ride from the eastern decrease of the city in Canyon Country along a paved lane which is independent from automobile traffic all the way to Valencia on the Santa Clara River Trail. This path contiguously follows the Santa Clara River and Soledad Canyon Road. There are many jumping-off points along this route providing entry to neighborhoods, Metrolink stations and commerce. In Valencia, there are several pedestrian bridges called paseos connected to the bike alleyway network. The paseos keep riders and walkers above and away from automobile traffic. The neighborhoods in Valencia were planned to include an plenty amount of walking and riding paths that be close to to this overall network. Santa Clarita contains beyond 77 miles (124 km) of bicycle routes. In 2007, the League of American Bicyclists awarded Santa Clarita its bronze designation as a bicycle kind community.

Air travel

There are no airports in the city of Santa Clarita. The nearest airports are the small Agua Dulce Airpark in Agua Dulce and Whiteman Airport in Pacoima. Commercial airlines fly into Bob Hope Airport in Burbank which is nearly 23 miles (37 km) and Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, approximately 42 miles (68 km) from Santa Clarita.

Culture

Films

Santa Clarita, along with additional foothill regions in Greater Los Angeles is known for its movie ranches. The valley contains complex movie ranches including Melody Ranch, Sable Ranch, Rancho Deluxe, Golden Oak Ranch, Blue Cloud Movie Ranch, and Veluzat Movie Ranch. These movie ranches lie within the studio zone, the Place within a 30-mile (48 km) radius of the intersection of Beverly and La Cienega Boulevards in West Los Angeles. Movie ranches are a major contributor to Santa Clarita’s economy, and the valley has been nicknamed “Hollywood North.” Movies and TV shows filmed in Santa Clarita include Django Unchained, NCIS, Franklin & Bash, Jane by Design, Make It or fracture It, The Muppets, Pirates of the Caribbean, 24, and Old Yeller.

Other filming locations in the Santa Clarita Valley combine CalArts, Castaic Lake, College of the Canyons, Westfield Valencia Town Center, Placerita Canyon State Park, Southern California Innovation Park (an office park in Valencia), Saugus Cafe, and Halfway House Cafe which is on the outskirts of Canyon Country. Vasquez Rocks, located in Agua Dulce just about 10 miles (16 km) northeast of the city, has next been used as a filming location for many movies and shows.

Santa Clarita was the tone of the horror-comedy show Santa Clarita Diet, which debuted on February 3, 2017 and was canceled upon April 26, 2019. The law revolves approximately the careers of genuine estate agents Joel and Sheila Hammond. Sheila Hammond becomes undead and starts need human flesh. As Joel and the family try helping Sheila during her metamorphosis, they harmony with neighbors and cultural norms.

Western films

Santa Clarita has been the home of many well-known stars of Western film, including William S. Hart, Harry Carey, John Ford, and Gene Autry. Western film, television, and radio figures are lucky at the Walk of Western Stars, located along Main Street in Old Town Newhall. Each April, the city of Santa Clarita inducts one or two supplementary honorees into the Walk of Western Stars. The wander was founded in 1981; previous honorees have included Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, John Wayne, Sam Elliott, Richard Farnsworth, and Bruce Dern. The induction ceremony is held in conjunction later than the Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival at William S. Hart Park.

Packard Humanities Institute

The Packard Humanities Institute, headquartered in Los Altos, also has a campus in Santa Clarita. The campus, which opened in 2014, is located in Valencia directly south of College of the Canyons. It includes a film preservation faculty which houses higher than 400,000 films from Paramount Pictures, Warner Brothers, Columbia Pictures, 20th Century Fox, and Republic Pictures.

Notable people

Sister cities

The city is a member of Sister Cities International.

Explanatory notes

References

External links

Source

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