Previous
Next

ADU Contractor Thousand Oaks, California

Something You Want To Know

ADU Contractor {location}
Accessory dwelling units

These commonly referred to as ADUs, are additional living quarters on a property that is separate from the primary residence. For an ADU Contractor in Thousand Oaks, these can be created through the conversion of existing space such as a basement or garage, or they can be built new as an addition to the property as well. 

In the city of Thousand Oaks, California, ADU must be approved through the planning process and must comply with all applicable zoning requirements. ADUs provide an opportunity for homeowners to create additional income streams, house extended family members, or provide housing for guests or tenants.

For more information on ADU in Thousand Oaks, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU in Thousand Oaks!

Best ADU Thousand Oaks Contractor.

discover your dream Thousand Oaks ADU?

Accessory dwelling units, also known as ADUs, are a great way to add additional living space to your home.

They can be used as a rental unit, in-law suite, or even just a private space for guests.

ADU Contractor {location}

Accessory dwelling unit, commonly known as ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Thousand Oaks as a way to create additional living space.

Whether you’re looking for a place for an aging parent, an adult child, or a tenant, an ADU can provide the perfect solution.

In addition, ADUs can be a great way to generate rental income. With the current housing market in Thousand Oaks, there has never been a better time to build an ADU.

WE’RE A LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR WHO PAYS ATTENTION TO YOUR NEEDS AND WANTS.

The ADU Thousand Oaks team is here to help you every step of the way, from obtaining the necessary permits to finding the right contractor.

If you’re in Thousand Oaks, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU!

ADU Thousand Oaks Services

If you’re thinking about adding an ADU to your property, there are a few things you need to know first.

The first step is to check with your local planning department to see if there are any restrictions on building an ADU in your neighborhood. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to start thinking about what type of unit you want to build.

There are many different types of ADUs, from small studio units to larger two-bedroom units. You’ll also need to decide if you want to build the unit from scratch or convert an existing space, such as a garage or guest house.

01.

3D DESIGN

We begin by creating your dream Accessory dwelling units with our state-of-the-art 3D design service.

02.

Demolition

We will take care of demolition and cleaning and turn your new Accessory dwelling units it into something special.

03.

Permit Acquisition

We make sure you get all the permits if necessary.

04.

Interior Design

Our Thousand Oaks ADU services will help you make your space more efficient.

05.

Electrical & Lighting

Lighting fixtures that will give your home’s interior its perfect atmosphere? We’ve got it covered!

06.

ADUS Cabinets

Whether you’re looking for a sleek, contemporary style or traditional elegance – we have the cabinets to suit your needs.

07.

Plumbing

Bathroom renovations will need some pluming work, to help you out, we offer a range of plumbing services as well!

08.

ADU Countertops

Accessory dwelling unit countertops? We offer a wide variety of stone, quartz, and marble options that will add beauty while also being functional in their use.

09.

Flooring

Finding the right flooring material for you and installing it correctly is important, but we take care of that too!

10.

Windows & Doors

We know you want the best, so our experts will help you with  Windows & Doors installation​​ for all your needs!

Do you need an ADU Thousand Oaks Inspiration? check this out!

Previous
Next

Let's Assess Your Thousand Oaks ADU Needs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that can be used for a variety of purposes. In Thousand Oaks, ADUs are typically used as rental units, guesthouses, or in-law suites.

However, they can also be used as primary residences, office spaces, or even recreational spaces. Regardless of how they are used, ADUs can provide a number of benefits to homeowners.

Los Angeles Accessory dwelling unit

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Thousand Oaks. These secondary units can provide additional living space for family members, and guests, or even generate income through rentals. However, the process of designing and building an ADU can be complex. Fortunately, there are a few key things to keep in mind that can help make the process go more smoothly.

First, it’s important to research the requirements and restrictions for ADUs in your city or county. Every jurisdiction has different rules and regulations governing its construction, so it’s important to be aware of these before you start designing your unit. Second, it’s also a good idea to hire an experienced architect or designer who specializes in ADUs.

They will be familiar with the local regulations and can help ensure that your unit is designed to meet all the requirements. Finally, once you have your plans finalized, it’s important to find a reputable contractor who has experience building ADUs. They will be able to guide you through the construction process and make sure that your unit is built to code.

If you’re thinking about adding an accessory dwelling unit to your property, please give us a call and we can help you with the process.

Top notch home remodeling services

Our vision, our passion

Kitchen remodel beautiful kitchen furniture the drawer in cabinet.

Hiring a professional Kitchen Remodeling contractor in Thousand Oaks and San Fernando Valley area is the best way to ensure that your remodeling plans are well thought out and executed.

We will provide you with everything from kitchen cabinets, to multiple countertop options while paying attention to small details such as lighting fixtures!

Trendy features of a modern bathroom

kitchenfer will help you transform your bathroom with a new design that is sure to make it stand out, We specialize in remodeling, modernizing, and designing bathrooms for all types of homes.

With our talented team of professionals, we can provide all the necessary services for your bathroom remodeling project in order to achieve exactly what’s desired!

Room addition

A room addition is a new structure built onto an existing home to create extra space. Room additions are extremely popular due to the fact they add valuable living space as well as home equity.

Our team at KitchenFer is highly experienced at designing and building room additions in Thousand Oaks, San Fernando Valley, and Ventura County.

Best Garage Remodeling Los Angeles

Have you been considering a garage conversion? If so, KitchenFer is the company for your! With our process-driven design and construction services, we will take care of everything.

As a homeowner, exploring a garage conversion can be such an exciting time and when you work with our team will make the conversion process as easy for you as possible.

Large house backyard

During a time when people are looking for more space in their homes, an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) is often the best solution. ADUs are perfect to add value and more living space to your property.

We’ll handle everything from design to construction so you don’t have any worries at all, we are a professional team that can manage your entire project.

House remodel

The concept of home remodeling is the process of renovating or making additions to a property. The interior, exterior, and other improvements can include projects such as Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions, garage conversion, accessory dwelling unit and more.

 Call us today! We’ll be happy to help you with all home remodeling projects!

Thousand Oaks ADU FAQs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that is attached or detached from a primary residence.

In the city of Thousand Oaks, ADUs are commonly referred to as “granny flats” or “in-law units.” They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing additional living space for family members or serving as a rental unit.

ADUs are subject to the same zoning and building regulations as the primary residence on the property. In addition, there are several specific requirements that must be met in order for an ADU to be approved by the city. For instance, the unit must be no larger than 1200 square feet and it must be located on a lot that is at least 6000 square feet in size.

An Accessory Dwelling Unit is a secondary living space that is attached or detached from a primary residence. They are also sometimes called granny flats, in-law units, or secondary units.

To be consistent with the California Building Code and the Health and Safety Code, an Accessory Dwelling Unit must meet the following requirements:

  • The unit must be located on a legal parcel of land that contains a single-family dwelling;
  • The unit must be subordinate to and have an exterior appearance consistent with the primary dwelling on the same parcel;
  • The unit must have no more than two bedrooms and one bathroom;
  • The floor area of the unit (excluding any garage) must be 600 square feet or less.
  • The unit must be served by utilities from the main dwelling or from separate utility connections. An Accessory Dwelling Unit may also be subject to other local zoning regulations.

 

For more information on Accessory Dwelling Units in the City of Los Angeles, please contact the Department of City Planning.

They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing extra living space for guests or family members, generating rental income, or creating a separate workspace.

In addition to the financial benefits, ADUs can also help to increase the overall value of your property. ADUs are subject to the same zoning regulations as the primary dwelling unit, so they must meet all local building and safety codes.

As a result, they can provide a much-needed boost to the housing supply in Los Angeles without negatively impacting the quality of life for residents.

If you’re considering adding an ADU to your property, be sure to contact us to learn more about the process and potential benefits.

Yes, ADUs are legal in the city of Thousand Oaks. In fact, the city has actually been working to make it easier for homeowners to build them by reducing zoning and permitting requirements. For more information on the current regulations surrounding ADUs in Thousand Oaks, you can visit the website of the Department of City Planning.

Geography

The city of Thousand Oaks is situated in the Conejo Valley in southeastern Ventura County, halfway between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, and 12 miles east of the Pacific Ocean. Conejo Valley lies at 900 feet; 55 of its 1,884 square miles are located within Thousand Oaks city limits. For comparison, the city is larger in area than Long Beach, CA, and 20 percent larger than San Francisco.

Designated open-space nature areas occupy 34 percent of the city as of 2017 (15,194 acres). 928 acres of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is within the southern borders of the city. Thousand Oaks is within the Greater Los Angeles Area and is 38 miles west of Los Angeles. Malibu is located on the other side of the Santa Monica Mountains. Conejo Valley is bordered by the Santa Monica’s to the south, Conejo Mountains to the west and north, and the Simi Hills to the northeast.

Thousand Oaks has grown due to the incorporation of neighboring cities. Two-thirds of Westlake Village and most of Newbury Park were annexed by the city in the 1960s and 1970s. Newbury Park currently makes up around 40 percent of the city’s total land area.

Thousand Oaks is located at 34°11′22″N 118°52′30″W / 34.18944°N 118.87500°W / 34.18944; -118.87500 (34.189489, -118.875053). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 55.2 square miles (143 km2). 55.0 square miles (142 km) of it is land and 0.15 square miles (0.39 km2) of it (0.27%) is water.

Although Thousand Oaks has several shopping centers, including the Janss Marketplace mall, The Oaks mall, and W. Thousand Oaks Blvd., a large portion of the city’s inhabitants live in suburban communities a distance from the commercial centers of the city. The large housing districts near Lynn Road to the north and west are an example of this sprawl, despite attempts by Ventura County planners to reduce it. Many housing tracts are surrounded by walls. This design is meant to keep heavy traffic away from residential roads.

Physiography

The physiography is dominated by prominent knolls, surrounding mountains, open vistas and native oak woodland. It is home to 50–60,000 oak trees, and the city is characterized by its many oak trees and rolling green hills.

The northern parts consist of mountainous terrain in the Simi Hills, Conejo Mountains and Mount Clef Ridge. Narrow canyons such as Hill Canyon cut through the steeper mountainous areas. Conejo Mountain and Conejo Grade are found in westernmost Newbury Park, while the southernmost parts of Thousand Oaks are made up of Russell Valley, Hidden Valley and the steep rugged slopes of the Santa Monica Mountains. The elevation ranges from 500 feet in the northwest to the 2,403 feet Simi Peak. The major drainage is Conejo Creek (Arroyo Conejo).

Wetlands include Lake Eleanor, Paradise Falls in Wildwood Regional Park, Twin Ponds in Dos Vientos and the 7-acre Hill Canyon Wetlands.

Climate

The region experiences a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Csa in the Köppen climate classification) or dry-summer subtropical zone climate, with hot, sunny, dry summers and mild winters with moderate rainfall. Vegetation is typical of Mediterranean environments, with chaparral and grasses on the hillsides and numerous western valley oaks. Its elevation ranges from about 500 to 900 feet (excluding the mountains and hills). The area has slightly cooler temperatures than the surrounding areas, as it receives cooler air from the ocean through various hill and mountain passes. On March 10 and 11, 2006, snow fell on the peak of Boney Mountain, the first snow to fall in the area in about 20 years. Snow also fell on Boney Peak on December 17 and 18, 2008.

In line with the rest of coastal California, temperatures at solar noon tend to fluctuate between 70 and 80 °F (21–26 °C) during summer, and rarely drop below 60–65 °F (15–18 °C) during winter.

History

Pre-colonial period

Chumash people were the first to inhabit the area, settling there over 10,000 years ago. It was home to two major villages: Sap’wi (“House of the Deer”) and Satwiwa (“The Bluffs”). Sap’wi is now by the Chumash Interpretive Center which is home to multiple 2,000 year-old pictographs. Satwiwa is the home of the Native American Indian Culture Center which sits at the foothills of Mount Boney in Newbury Park, a sacred mountain to the Chumash.

A smaller village, Yitimasɨh, was located where Wildwood Elementary School sits today. The area surrounding Wildwood Regional Park has been inhabited by the Chumash for thousands of years. Some of the artifacts discovered in Wildwood include stone tools, shell beads and arrowheads. Another small Chumash settlement, known as Šihaw (Ven-632i), was located where Lang Ranch sits today. A cave containing several swordfish and cupules pictographs is located here. Two other villages were located by today’s Ventu Park Road in Newbury Park. These were populated 2,000 years ago and had a population of 100–200 in each village. Other villages included Lalimanuc (Lalimanux) and Kayɨwɨš (Kayiwish) by Conejo Grade.

The Chumash also had several summer encampments, including one located where Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza currently stands, known as Ipuc (Ven-654). Another summer encampment was located at the current location of Los Robles Hospital.

Each village was ruled by a chief or several chieftains, who often traveled between villages to discuss matters of common interest. A council of elders directed village life and organized events. Most villages had a cemetery, gaming field, a sweat house, and a place for ceremonies. Locally discovered tribal artifacts are at display at Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center and the Chumash Indian Museum.

The region’s recorded history dates to 1542, when Spanish explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo landed at Point Mugu and claimed the land for Spain. The Battle of Triunfo, which took place by Triunfo Creek, was waged over land between native Chumash and the Spanish newcomers.

19th century

From 1804 to 1848, Thousand Oaks was part of Alta California, which originally was a Spanish polity in North America. It was the Spaniards who first named it Conejo Valley, or Valley of Rabbits. The Spaniards and indigenous Chumash clashed numerous times in disputes over land. Conejo Valley was given the name El Rancho Conejo in 1803. This year, Jose Polanco and Ignacio Rodriguez were granted El Rancho Conejo by Governor José Joaquín de Arrillaga of Alta California. The land contained 48,671.56 acres. El Conejo was just one of two land grants in what became Ventura County, the other being Rancho Simi.

As a result of the Mexican War of Independence in 1822, Alta California became a Mexican territory. In 1822, Captain José de la Guerra y Noriega filed Conejo Valley as part of the Mexican land grant. It remained a part of Mexico until the short-lived California Republic was established in 1846. It became a part of the U.S. after California gained statehood in 1850. The valley was now known as Rancho El Conejo. The ranch period began when the de la Guerra family sold thousands of acres through the 1860s and early 1870s.

Two men owned most of Conejo Valley in the 1870s: John Edwards, who came from Wales in 1849, and Howard Mills, who came from Minnesota in 1870. While Edwards owned most of present-day Thousand Oaks and Newbury Park, Mills owned most of Westlake Village and Hidden Valley. Edwards’ home was located on an acre of land where The Oaks Mall currently is located, while Mills built his home where Westlake Lake sits today. The third person to buy former Rancho El Conejo land was Egbert Starr Newbury. He bought 2,259 acres of land here in 1874, land which stretched from Old Town Thousand Oaks and into today’s Newbury Park. He later established the valley’s first post office in 1875: Newbury Park Post Office. When the Conejo Valley School District was established in March 1877, there were 126 residents living in Conejo Valley.

In the late 19th century, Newbury Park was on the stagecoach route between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. The Stagecoach Inn (Grand Union Hotel) was built in 1876, and is now a California Historical Landmark and museum.

Norwegian Colony

Thousand Oaks was home to a Norwegian community in the late 1890s and early 1900s, known as Norwegian Colony. Norwegian settlers were among the first to settle in Conejo Valley. The Norwegian Colony was located at today’s intersection of Moorpark- and Olsen Roads, now home to California Lutheran University and surrounding areas. The Norwegian Colony constituted of over 650 acres and stretched from Mount Clef Ridge to Avenida de Los Arboles. The son of Norwegian immigrants donated his ranch to California Lutheran College in the 1950s. California Lutheran University is now home to the Scandinavian American Cultural and Historical Foundation and the Scandinavian Festival.[citation needed]

Many place names are named after Norwegian immigrants such as the Olsen and Pedersen families. The first Norwegians came from the village of Stranda by Storfjorden. Ole Anderson bought 199 acres here, while Lars Pederson owned 111 acres. Other Norwegian pioneers also included Ole Nilsen, George Hansen and Nils Olsen. A major contribution was the construction of the handmade Norwegian Grade in 1911, a mile-long road leading from Thousand Oaks to Santa Rosa Valley.

With no doctors or hospitals nearby, the Norwegian Colony was short-lived. The Olsen family lost seven of their ten children, while Ole Anderson, Lars Pederson, and George Hansen all died in 1901 due to a diphtheria epidemic.

20th century

Newbury Park was a more established community than Thousand Oaks at the turn of the 20th century. A few lots existed early in the 1900s, wedged between Borchard land on the south and Friedrich land on the north. The Janss family, developers of Southern California subdivisions, purchased 10,000 acres (40 km2) in the early 20th century. They eventually created plans for a “total community”, and the name remains prominently featured in the city. Despite early aspirations, no large subdivisions were developed until the 1920s. The development was slow and hampered even more under the Great Depression of the 1930s. Besides agriculture, the movie industry became an important industry in the 1920s and 1930s.

Between 1950 and 1970, Conejo Valley experienced a population boom, and increased its population from 3,000 to 30,000 residents. From 3,500 residents in 1957, Thousand Oaks had over 103,000 inhabitants by 1989. While ranching and agriculture were the dominant industries until the 1950s, a number of new businesses appeared throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Particularly many high-tech firms moved to Thousand Oaks in the ’60s and ’70s. Packard Bell and Technology Instrument Company were two high-technology businesses that moved into the Newbury Park industrial park in the 1960s. Other companies that followed included Westinghouse Astroelectronics Laboratory, Semtech Corporation, Purolator Inc., and Westland Plastics.

Jungleland USA put Thousand Oaks on the map in the 1920s and helped attract Hollywood producers to the city. Hundreds of movies have been filmed in Thousand Oaks. Some of the first films to be made here were The Birth of a Nation (1915) at Jungleland USA and Roaring Ranch (1930) at the Stagecoach Inn. Thousand Oaks Boulevard was featured in the “Walls of Jericho” scenes in the film It Happened One Night (1934). A western village was erected at California Lutheran University for the filming of Welcome to Hard Times (1967), while Elvis Presley and John Wayne starred in several westerns made in Wildwood Regional Park. A nearby road, Flaming Star Avenue, is named after the film Flaming Star (1960) starring Elvis Presley, which was filmed here. Other movies filmed in the valley included Lassie Come Home (1943), To the Shores of Iwo Jima (1945) and The Dukes of Hazzard (1979–85). Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis visited Thousand Oaks for the filming of Hollywood or Bust (1956), which included a scene filmed on Live Oak Street.

Movie actor Joel McCrea, who had been advised by Will Rogers to buy land in the area, raised his family on a 3,000-acre (1,200 ha) ranch he had acquired in the early 1930s. Numerous celebrities later joined McCrea and relocated to the Conejo Valley, including Dean Martin, Bob Hope, Roy Rogers, Strother Martin, Virginia Mayo, Michael O’Shea, Ben Johnson, Slim Pickens, Ronald Colman, George Brent, Eve Arden, Alan Ladd, Richard Widmark, Charles Martin Smith, and Bing- and Kurt Russell.

While the city was home to 1,700 businesses in 1970, Thousand Oaks had 11,000 businesses in town by 1988.

The world’s largest independent biotechnology company, Amgen, was established in Newbury Park in 1980.

Jungleland USA

Louis Goebel of New York bought five lots off Ventura Boulevard (today’s Thousand Oaks Boulevard) in 1925. He worked for the Universal film studio, and decided to create his own film industry zoo after the closure of Universal Zoo in the mid-1920s. He established Goebel’s Lion Farm in 1926, situated where Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza is located today. Goebel began with five lions and seven malamute dogs, but he soon acquired new animals such as giraffes, camels, hippos, monkeys, tigers, gorillas, seals and other exotic animals.

It became home to several animals used for Leo the Lion MGM logo. There were held public animal shows, which drew thousands of spectators from throughout California. The animals from the park have been used in many movies and TV series, including many of the Tarzan films; The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), which used the site as a location, and Doctor Doolittle (1967). Goebel himself camped by the filming site of Tarzan, the Ape Man (1932) by Lake Sherwood to watch his lions during filming.

It became one of Southern California’s most popular tourists attractions in the 1940s and 1950s, when the 170-acre park offered shows, lion training, elephant rides, train rides, safari tram buses and more. The park changed name to Jungleland USA in 1956 after Disneyland was established. The park later went bankrupt in May 1969, due to competition from parks such as Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farm and Universal Studios. The park’s 1,800 animals were sold at a public auction in October 1969.

Incorporation

The City of Thousand Oaks was incorporated on October 7, 1964. On September 29, 1964, voters approved the incorporation and selected the name. The incorporation became official once the certificates of election were filed with the California Secretary of State, and the record of affidavit was filed with the Ventura County Clerk.

The results of the cityhood election was clear on September 24, 1964. 2,780 residents voted to set up a city, while 1,821 had voted no to incorporation. Certain areas however tried to set up its own municipality. An attempt at a cityhood election in Newbury Park failed in 1963, as Talley Corporation and Janss Rancho Conejo Industrial Park refused to join the efforts. Reba Hays Jeffries, a local opponent of cityhood, told interviewers why she thought the cityhood election failed: Cityhood backers had to collect signatures from owners who represented 29% of the land that was to be incorporated. As the efforts collected 29% of registered voters, the measure never came on the ballot. Most Newbury Park land were annexed through the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. Casa Conejo and Ventu Park are the only parts of Newbury Park left, which are not parts of Thousand Oaks. Lynn Ranch also decided to remain outside city limits.

Two-thirds of Westlake Village were annexed by Thousand Oaks in two portions – in 1968 and 1972. The Westlake neighborhood of North Ranch remained an unincorporated area until January 1973, when Thousand Oaks approved the annexation of North Ranch. North Ranch borders Oak Park, an unincorporated area where voters have chosen not to be annexed into Thousand Oaks.

Modern history

Thousand Oaks is encouraging mixed-use retail and housing development along the downtown portion of Thousand Oaks Boulevard. The city is built-out within the confines of the Conejo Valley and has adopted a smart growth strategy as there is no room for the sprawling suburban growth the city is known for.

Increased development in Moorpark and Simi Valley in the late 1990s and early 2000s caused the Moorpark Freeway (Highway 23) to become heavily congested during both morning and afternoon rush hours. A major widening project began in 2008.

On March 30, 2016, California Lutheran University and the NFL Rams team reached an agreement that allowed the team to have regular season training operations at CLU’s campus in Thousand Oaks for the next two years. The Rams paid for two practice fields, paved parking, and modular buildings constructed on the northwestern corner of the campus.

On November 7, 2018, a lone gunman killed 12 people in a mass shooting at the Borderline Bar & Grill. Just days later, as a vigil was held for those impacted by the shooting, the massive Hill Fire and Woolsey Fire threatened the community, burning homes across Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. The fires would continue through almost the entire month of November charring almost 100,000 acres and consuming multiple homes in the region as it burned through Agoura Hills, Westlake Village, and Thousand Oaks, all the way to the Malibu coastline.[citation needed]

In February 2019, in what was called a response to the shooting, members of the Westboro Baptist Church demonstrated outside Thousand Oaks High School. Parents, students, faith communities, and community members held a counter-demonstration across the street.

Source

RSS ADUs & Home Remodeling Ideas By houzz
  • Kitchen of the Week: Warm and Cheerful Style With Pink Cabinets (8 photos) September 29, 2022
    This couple wanted a kitchen that sparked joy — and they definitely weren’t getting that with their existing kitchen’s basic white and gray finishes and closed-off layout. In search of a brighter, cheerier look with more storage and an improved layout, they turned to design-build pro Philip Hide....
  • Houzz Tour: New Furnishings Suit Homeowners’ Love of Art (11 photos) September 28, 2022
    The clean and contemporary architecture of this downtown Austin, Texas, house suited its young homeowners. They called on the interior designers at Etch Design Group to help them furnish it. As often happens, the scope of the project grew a bit, including a new fireplace surround and a partial renovation...
  • Pros Share the Design Styles Their Clients Request the Most (11 photos) September 27, 2022
    Forming a strong emotional attachment to a design style, aesthetic or point of view can happen naturally when you’re considering a new home project. You might gravitate toward certain design styles — whether it’s traditional, midcentury modern or a newer aesthetic like cottagecore, coastal grandmother...
  • Bathroom of the Week: Light Look With a Blue-Green Vanity (5 photos) September 27, 2022
    Diana de los Rios’ Craftsman-style home has been in her family since it was built in 1924. It’d been remodeled over the years, but when she and husband Nicholas Santillan and their 4-year-old son moved in in 2021, they wanted to update the rooms with a fresh and timeless style. A big focus was...
  • Before and After: 3 Backyards With a Beautiful Water Feature (9 photos) September 26, 2022
    The sound of falling water brings a sense of peace and serenity to an outdoor space. It also creates a focal point within the landscape, drawing people to both the sound of moving water and the play of the water itself over the surfaces. The fountains in the three landscapes showcased below vary in size...
  • Choose the Right Pendant Lights for Your Kitchen Island (29 photos) September 26, 2022
    The kitchen island pendant can be the jewelry of the kitchen, an important fixture to help with your everyday tasks and so much more. To help narrow down your choice from the seemingly infinite range of beautiful options, here’s a guide to choosing the type and style of pendant that suits your tastes...
  • Houzz Tour: Woodsy Lakefront Getaway Designed for Generations (19 photos) September 25, 2022
    When remodeling your new vacation house, giving your interior designer a budget and letting her run with it takes a lot of trust. Almost as much trust as letting your spouse choose the house without setting foot inside it yourself. But that’s exactly what happened when an Atlanta couple with two young...
  • Houzz Call: Show Us Your Recent Home Improvement Projects! (4 photos) September 25, 2022
    Houzz readers, did you kick off 2022 with a list of home improvement projects to tackle? Was this the year you hired a pro to get that dream kitchen or bath? Did you finally organize your pantry or closet? Perhaps you looked outdoors for inspiration and started a garden or built a new deck?Whatever...