Previous slide
Next slide

ADU Contractor Valley Village, California

These commonly referred to as ADUs, are additional living quarters on a property that is separate from the primary residence. For an ADU Contractor in Valley Village, these can be created through the conversion of existing space such as a basement or garage, or they can be built new as an addition to the property as well. 

In the city of Valley Village, California, ADU must be approved through the planning process and must comply with all applicable zoning requirements. ADUs provide an opportunity for homeowners to create additional income streams, house extended family members, or provide housing for guests or tenants.

For more information on ADU in Valley Village, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU in Valley Village!

Best ADU Valley Village Contractor.

discover your dream Valley Village ADU?

Accessory dwelling units, also known as ADUs, are a great way to add additional living space to your home.

They can be used as a rental unit, in-law suite, or even just a private space for guests.

ADU Contractor

Accessory dwelling unit, commonly known as ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Valley Village as a way to create additional living space.

Whether you’re looking for a place for an aging parent, an adult child, or a tenant, an ADU can provide the perfect solution.

In addition, ADUs can be a great way to generate rental income. With the current housing market in Valley Village, there has never been a better time to build an ADU.

WE’RE A LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTOR WHO PAYS ATTENTION TO YOUR NEEDS AND WANTS.

The ADU Valley Village team is here to help you every step of the way, from obtaining the necessary permits to finding the right contractor.

If you’re in Valley Village, please contact us today to get started on your dream ADU!

ADU Valley Village Services

If you’re thinking about adding an ADU to your property, there are a few things you need to know first.

The first step is to check with your local planning department to see if there are any restrictions on building an ADU in your neighborhood. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to start thinking about what type of unit you want to build.

There are many different types of ADUs, from small studio units to larger two-bedroom units. You’ll also need to decide if you want to build the unit from scratch or convert an existing space, such as a garage or guest house.

01.

3D DESIGN

We begin by creating your dream Accessory dwelling units with our state-of-the-art 3D design service.

02.

Demolition

We will take care of demolition and cleaning and turn your new Accessory dwelling units it into something special.

03.

Permit Acquisition

We make sure you get all the permits if necessary.

04.

Interior Design

Our Valley Village ADU services will help you make your space more efficient.

05.

Electrical & Lighting

Lighting fixtures that will give your home’s interior its perfect atmosphere? We’ve got it covered!

06.

ADUS Cabinets

Whether you’re looking for a sleek, contemporary style or traditional elegance – we have the cabinets to suit your needs.

07.

Plumbing

Bathroom renovations will need some pluming work, to help you out, we offer a range of plumbing services as well!

08.

ADU Countertops

Accessory dwelling unit countertops? We offer a wide variety of stone, quartz, and marble options that will add beauty while also being functional in their use.

09.

Flooring

Finding the right flooring material for you and installing it correctly is important, but we take care of that too!

10.

Windows & Doors

We know you want the best, so our experts will help you with  Windows & Doors installation​​ for all your needs!

Do you need an ADU Valley Village Inspiration? check this out!

Previous slide
Next slide

Let's Assess Your Valley Village ADU Needs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that can be used for a variety of purposes. In Valley Village, ADUs are typically used as rental units, guesthouses, or in-law suites.

However, they can also be used as primary residences, office spaces, or even recreational spaces. Regardless of how they are used, ADUs can provide a number of benefits to homeowners.

ADU Contractors in Los Angeles

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are becoming increasingly popular in Valley Village. These secondary units can provide additional living space for family members, and guests, or even generate income through rentals. However, the process of designing and building an ADU can be complex. Fortunately, there are a few key things to keep in mind that can help make the process go more smoothly.

First, it’s important to research the requirements and restrictions for ADUs in your city or county. Every jurisdiction has different rules and regulations governing its construction, so it’s important to be aware of these before you start designing your unit. Second, it’s also a good idea to hire an experienced architect or designer who specializes in ADUs.

They will be familiar with the local regulations and can help ensure that your unit is designed to meet all the requirements. Finally, once you have your plans finalized, it’s important to find a reputable contractor who has experience building ADUs. They will be able to guide you through the construction process and make sure that your unit is built to code.

If you’re thinking about adding an accessory dwelling unit to your property, please give us a call and we can help you with the process.

Top notch home remodeling services

Our vision, our passion

Kitchen remodel beautiful kitchen furniture the drawer in cabinet.

Hiring a professional Kitchen Remodeling contractor in Valley Village and San Fernando Valley area is the best way to ensure that your remodeling plans are well thought out and executed.

We will provide you with everything from kitchen cabinets, to multiple countertop options while paying attention to small details such as lighting fixtures!

Trendy features of a modern bathroom

kitchenfer will help you transform your bathroom with a new design that is sure to make it stand out, We specialize in remodeling, modernizing, and designing bathrooms for all types of homes.

With our talented team of professionals, we can provide all the necessary services for your bathroom remodeling project in order to achieve exactly what’s desired!

Room addition

A room addition is a new structure built onto an existing home to create extra space. Room additions are extremely popular due to the fact they add valuable living space as well as home equity.

Our team at KitchenFer is highly experienced at designing and building room additions in Valley Village, San Fernando Valley, and Ventura County.

Best Garage Remodeling Los Angeles

Have you been considering a garage conversion? If so, KitchenFer is the company for your! With our process-driven design and construction services, we will take care of everything.

As a homeowner, exploring a garage conversion can be such an exciting time and when you work with our team will make the conversion process as easy for you as possible.

Large house backyard

During a time when people are looking for more space in their homes, an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) is often the best solution. ADUs are perfect to add value and more living space to your property.

We’ll handle everything from design to construction so you don’t have any worries at all, we are a professional team that can manage your entire project.

House remodel

The concept of home remodeling is the process of renovating or making additions to a property. The interior, exterior, and other improvements can include projects such as Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions, garage conversion, accessory dwelling unit and more.

 Call us today! We’ll be happy to help you with all home remodeling projects!

Valley Village ADU FAQs

Accessory dwelling units, or ADUs, are a type of secondary housing unit that is attached or detached from a primary residence.

In the city of Valley Village, ADUs are commonly referred to as “granny flats” or “in-law units.” They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing additional living space for family members or serving as a rental unit.

ADUs are subject to the same zoning and building regulations as the primary residence on the property. In addition, there are several specific requirements that must be met in order for an ADU to be approved by the city. For instance, the unit must be no larger than 1200 square feet and it must be located on a lot that is at least 6000 square feet in size.

An Accessory Dwelling Unit is a secondary living space that is attached or detached from a primary residence. They are also sometimes called granny flats, in-law units, or secondary units.

To be consistent with the California Building Code and the Health and Safety Code, an Accessory Dwelling Unit must meet the following requirements:

  • The unit must be located on a legal parcel of land that contains a single-family dwelling;
  • The unit must be subordinate to and have an exterior appearance consistent with the primary dwelling on the same parcel;
  • The unit must have no more than two bedrooms and one bathroom;
  • The floor area of the unit (excluding any garage) must be 600 square feet or less.
  • The unit must be served by utilities from the main dwelling or from separate utility connections. An Accessory Dwelling Unit may also be subject to other local zoning regulations.

 

For more information on Accessory Dwelling Units in the City of Los Angeles, please contact the Department of City Planning.

They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as providing extra living space for guests or family members, generating rental income, or creating a separate workspace.

In addition to the financial benefits, ADUs can also help to increase the overall value of your property. ADUs are subject to the same zoning regulations as the primary dwelling unit, so they must meet all local building and safety codes.

As a result, they can provide a much-needed boost to the housing supply in Los Angeles without negatively impacting the quality of life for residents.

If you’re considering adding an ADU to your property, be sure to contact us to learn more about the process and potential benefits.

Yes, ADUs are legal in the city of Valley Village. In fact, the city has actually been working to make it easier for homeowners to build them by reducing zoning and permitting requirements. For more information on the current regulations surrounding ADUs in Valley Village, you can visit the website of the Department of City Planning.

Service Areas

Valley Village is a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, located within the San Fernando Valley.

History

Founding

According to Elke Garman, co-president of the Valley Village Homeowners Association in 1991, the records of Valley Village went urge on to the 1930s, when workers at easily reached motion Describe studios built houses there. The local declare office upon Magnolia Boulevard canceled everything mail later than a “Valley Village” postmark. It was, however, officially a section of North Hollywood.

On page 30 of his autobiography Endless Highway, David Carradine says:

Separation from North Hollywood

The idea of separating Valley Village from North Hollywood was brought into public light considering a meeting of virtually 300 homeowners at Colfax Avenue Elementary School in December 1985, yet it wasn’t until 1991 that Valley Village got seven additional blue reflective markers from the city of Los Angeles to mark its borders.

Reporter James Quinn of the Los Angeles Times wrote that Valley Village no longer wanted to be united with North Hollywood, “a community that has grown old, heavily Latino and crime-plagued,” but, in the thesame article, Valley Village leader Tom Paterson was quoted as motto that the move “was on peak of an try to boost property values” and that it “had nothing to accomplish with ethnic demographics.” Rather, he said, “It was one economic level seeking to have its own identity.” Quinn wrote that:

“Stucco mountains”

In December 1985, some three hundred homeowners gathered at Colfax Avenue Elementary School to begin a raise a fuss to head off progress of what they called “stucco mountains” – continued construction of large apartments and office buildings in the area. Councilman Joel Wachs said he would hold the drive, although he rejected the details of a proposed reproving panel for the area. He said a proposed panel of homeowners might overlook the concerns of renters and the dependence for rental housing. Residents complained virtually blocked views, parking problems and traffic congestion because of buildings as tall as five stories neighboring their single-family homes.

The accomplish would not have banned construction but would have limited everything new buildings to two stories and the square footage of want ad development to 1 1/2 get older the size of the lot. The target had the maintain of Valley Village resident Tom Paterson, president of the Valley Village Homeowners Association, but the opponent of, for one, Marvin Eisenman, an apartment-building owner who said it would not be fair to landowners who purchased property as soon as the idea of developing it. It was touted as a temporary pretense until city planners could conduct public hearings upon new, permanent early payment limits. On September 17, 1986, the City Council approved the idea on a 10–2 vote, but less than a month complex it reversed itself after close lobbying – by former Councilman Arthur K. Snyder, among others – and sent the ordinance support to committee, with the idea that it could be brought encourage with exemptions for areas where progress had already occurred. Finally, substantially the same measure was recognized by the council on a performing arts basis as soon as exemptions for two dozen properties in areas where there had already been substantial development, like the south side of Riverside Drive together with Colfax Avenue and Laurel Canyon Boulevard.

Eventually, the Los Angeles city Planning Commission recommended that a three-story limit be adopted for the Valley Village area.

Geography

City of Los Angeles

The boundaries of Valley Village as delineated by the Valley Village Neighborhood Council are Burbank Blvd to the north, the Tujunga Wash to the west, the Ventura Freeway (US 101) to the south and CA 170 to the east.

Google Maps

The boundaries of Valley Village as delineated by Google Maps are Burbank Blvd to the north, the Tujunga Wash to the west, the Ventura Freeway (US 101) to the south and CA 170 to the east.

The Los Angeles Times’ Mapping L.A. Project

The Los Angeles Times Mapping L.A. Project delineates the Valley Village borders as Burbank Blvd. to the north, the Hollywood Freeway to the east, the Ventura Freeway to the south and Coldwater Canyon Avenue to the west.

The 2.09-square-mile (5.4 km) neighborhood lies north of Studio City, east of Sherman Oaks, and south and west of North Hollywood.

Climate

Located within the San Fernando Valley, Valley Village has a well ahead degree of diurnal temperature variation than the genial basin or coastal areas. According to the Köppen climate classification system, Valley Village has a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Csa), with subtropical and semi-arid characteristics. Summers are long, hot, dry and smoggy, with average tall temperatures in the mid-80s to lower-90s °F (30–34 °C), with nighttime lows in the upper-50s to lower-60s °F (14–17 °C). Temperatures reach or surpass 100 °F (38 °C) several epoch during the summer, raising the risk of heat prosecution or other heat-related illnesses. The all-time record tall temperature in Valley Village is 117 °F (47 °C), recorded on September 6, 2020.

Winters are short, sunny and typically warm, with average tall temperatures in the upper-60s to lower-70s °F (20–23 °C), but with Cool nights in the lower-to-mid 40s °F (4–7 °C). Winter is as a consequence the wet season, but rain is usually infrequent, even during the winter months, as most of the area’s rain comes from Pacific storms. It can be especially rainy during El Niño cycles, with flash flooding sometimes occurring. Sub-freezing temperatures (32 °F, 0 °C) and below, as with ease as frosts, occur several become old during the winter; however, these Cool weather comings and goings are typically brief, usually solitary lasting for a day or two before temperatures reward to normal. Snow is definitely rare. The all-time autograph album low temperature in Valley Village is 23 °F (–5 °C), recorded on January 29, 1979.

Spring and fall hardly exist in this climate, with these months typically bodily sunny and warm. The Santa Ana winds typically occur between slip and spring, lowering humidity levels and raising temperatures, which increases the risk for wildfires. During the late spring and forward summer, more specifically in the months of May and June, conditions are often overcast and foggy, a phenomenon known by local residents as “May Gray” or “June Gloom”.

Housing

In 1994, the Los Angeles Times called Valley Village an “area of upscale residences.” The 2000 census found that renters occupied 68.7% of the housing units, and homeowners occupied the unshakable 31.3%. In 2006, Valley Village was described in complementary article as a neighborhood “mostly of 1,700 sqft, single-story Spanish- and ranch-style homes that typically sit upon nice-size lots.” Most of the 3,881 single-family homes were upon residential streets, and 1,073 condos and 8,213 apartment units lined the main boulevards.

Population

A total of 24,190 people lived in Valley Village’s 2.09 square miles, according to the 2000 U.S. census – averaging 11,600 people per square mile, about average for Los Angeles. Population was estimated at 25,665 in 2008. With its percentage of white people considered high for Los Angeles County, Valley Village is still moderately diverse in its ethnic makeup, with a diversity index of 0.512. “The diversity index trial the probability that any two residents, chosen at random, would be of alternative ethnicities. If everything residents are of the thesame ethnic action it’s zero. If half are from one help and half from another it’s .50.” Whites made occurring 66.7% of the population, Latinos were 18.9%, with black people at 5.5% and Asians and others both at 4.4%. The median age was 36, considered old taking into consideration compared to the city as a whole. There is a sizable Jewish community.

The $55,470 median household income in 2008 dollars was average for the city and county. The average household size of two people was low for both the city and the county. The percentages of divorced men, divorced women, never-married men and widowed women were along with the county’s highest.

Education

Schools within Valley Village are:

High schools:

Continuation school:

Elementary schools:

Parks and recreation

Marilyn Monroe house

A house at 5258 Hermitage Avenue, where film actress Marilyn Monroe lived in 1944–45 under her married publicize of Norma Jean Dougherty, was demolished by a property developer to make pretension for a condominium project in June 2015 even as it was under consideration as a historic landmark. She lived there at age 17 even though her husband, James Dougherty, was in the Navy, and she had a job inspecting parachutes at a friendly factory. She was perky there afterward she was asked to pose for her first pin-up photo. It was said, however, that the chances of the home being acknowledged a landmark were slender because, as Ken Bernstein, director of the city’s Office of Historic Resources, put it, “There are hundreds, if not thousands, of houses associated with celebrities. Monroe resided at the property for only one year “and did not flesh and blood in the unit during the productive epoch of her career,” a bank account by city planning officials said.

In October 2015, Los Angeles was facing a lawsuit higher than the house’s destruction by a intervention called Save Valley Village. At concern was the City Council’s practice of “automatically heeding the wishes” of the council devotee who represents any given area in a controversy. The work said it furthermore had “overwhelming evidence” that an environmental financial credit should have been prepared for the condo project. The activity also asked that the city nullify any innovation projects that standard unanimous withhold during the previous twelve months.

Notable residents

Twin towns

Valley Village is twinned when Saint-Nom-la-Bretèche, France.

References

External links

Source

RSS ADUs & Home Remodeling Ideas By houzz
  • 4 New Kitchens With Fun Backsplash Ideas (8 photos) June 14, 2024
    A backsplash typically occupies a generous amount of visual space in a kitchen. Depending on your choice of colors and materials, you can play down the visual plane so it recedes from view, or you can punch it up with some attention-grabbing personality. Here, pros show examples of the latter. See how...
  • How to Get Rid of Household Mold (11 photos) June 14, 2024
    You can procrastinate about some cleaning tasks, but when it comes to mold, it’s better to take care of it sooner rather than later. Mold can cause health problems and destroy whatever it grows on. The spores of mold fungi commonly float through the air, and when they adhere to damp surfaces and start...
  • Kitchen of the Week: Warm and Inviting in White, Wood and Green (13 photos) June 13, 2024
    When Kansas couple Calvin and Amy Girard bought their 1952 brick home in 2012, they knew they would one day have to do something about the extremely tight kitchen and its lack of countertop space and cabinet storage. They kept putting it off for years until things started going awry. In 2021, the plumbing...
  • What to Know About Adding a Pergola (19 photos) June 12, 2024
    A pergola is remarkably versatile. The material it is made of and where you place it in your garden can turn it from a functional but basic structure into a one-of-a-kind statement piece. Extras can range from lights, ceiling fans and adjustable overhead slats to entertainment systems, fire features...
  • Houzz Tour: Moody Makeover for a Coastal New England Home (34 photos) June 11, 2024
    The tiny island of Nantucket, Massachusetts, is so often shrouded in a thick fog, it’s nicknamed the Gray Lady. Rather than fight nature, when designer Kaitlin McQuaide recently redesigned the interior of a circa 1900 house on the island, she and her client leaned in, choosing a palette of dark and midtone...
  • Bathroom of the Week: Parisian Sophistication in a Chicago Condo (13 photos) June 11, 2024
    Chicago homeowner Jennee Rommel loves all things elegant and French. Unfortunately, nothing in her condo’s primary bathroom suited her love of Parisian hotel bathrooms. “I knew the existing bathroom had to go. It was very basic beige and was not my flavor at all,” she says. She had a strong idea of what...
  • Before and After: 3 Kitchens With Beautiful Bold Backsplashes (7 photos) June 10, 2024
    In an area that’s bigger than a breadbox and smaller than a wall, framed by cabinets or other features, a kitchen backsplash is a natural place for a striking artistic touch. Whether with vivid colors, a dramatic pattern or both, a bold backsplash can take a kitchen from sensible to sensational in the...
  • 12 Trees Landscape Designers Love for Containers (14 photos) June 10, 2024
    Having a small yard or other confined outdoor space, whether it’s a tiny patch of land, patio or deck, doesn’t mean you have to give up on growing a tree. While they’ll never reach the height of a stately elm or oak, the following trees and tree-like shrubs can add a focal point, shade and […]